ITEMS IN AFP WITH KEYWORD:

Coronary Artery Disease

Sep 1, 2012 Issue
Should Family Physicians Use Coronary Artery Calcium Scores to Screen for Coronary Artery Disease? Yes: Screening Improves CAD Risk Management in Selected Patients [Editorials: Controversies in Family Medicine]

Yes: Screening Improves CAD Risk Management in Selected Patients. Sudden death is often the first manifestation of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD). One-third of deaths from CAD in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study occurred without warning signs, and there was no prior diagnosis of CAD in most of these persons.


Sep 1, 2012 Issue
Should Family Physicians Use Coronary Artery Calcium Scores to Screen for Coronary Artery Disease? No: Screening is Unproven, Expensive, and Potentially Harmful [Editorials: Controversies in Family Medicine]

No: Screening is Unproven, Expensive, and Potentially Harmful. Coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores have been recommended as a way to screen for coronary artery disease (CAD). Before we get too enthusiastic about this expensive new test, remember that a good screening test must perform significantly...


Apr 1, 2011 Issue
Medical Management of Stable Coronary Artery Disease [Article]

All patients with stable coronary artery disease require medical therapy to prevent disease progression and recurrent cardiovascular events. Three classes of medication are essential to therapy: lipid-lowering, antihypertensive, and antiplatelet agents. Lipid-lowering therapy is necessary to decreas...


Feb 15, 2011 Issue
Using Nontraditional Risk Factors in Coronary Heart Disease Risk Assessment: Recommendation Statement [U.S. Preventive Services Task Force]

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of using the nontraditional risk factors discussed in this statement to screen asymptomatic men and women with no history of coronary heart disease (CHD) to prevent CHD events.


Feb 15, 2011 Issue
Using Nontraditional Risk Factors in Coronary Heart Disease Risk Assessment [Putting Prevention into Practice]

Case study: A 47-year-old man with no history of coronary heart disease (CHD), diabetes mellitus, or any CHD risk equivalent asks about smoking cessation therapies. His past laboratory results include a total cholesterol level of 230 mg per dL (5.96 mmol per L) and a high-density lipoprotein level of 35 mg per dL (0.91 mmol per L).


Dec 1, 2010 Issue
Sudden Cardiac Death and Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators [Article]

Sudden cardiac death is a major public health problem, affecting 500,000 patients in the United States annually. An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) can terminate malignant ventricular arrhythmias and has been shown to improve survival in high-risk populations. Although sudden cardiac de...


Aug 1, 2010 Issue
Global Risk of Coronary Heart Disease: Assessment and Application [Article]

Coronary heart disease is the most common cause of death in the United States. The conventional risk factor approach to primary prevention excludes many patients who could benefit from preventive therapies. A global risk approach allows more accurate estimates of risk to guide clinical primary preve...


Feb 1, 2010 Issue
Secondary Prevention of Coronary Artery Disease [Article]

Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of mortality in the United States. In patients who have had a myocardial infarction or revascularization procedure, secondary prevention of coronary artery disease by comprehensive risk factor modification reduces mortality, decreases subsequent cardiac e...


Dec 1, 2009 Issue
Drug-Eluting Coronary Artery Stents [Article]

Many advances have been made in the percutaneous treatment of coronary artery disease during the past 30 years. Although balloon angioplasty alone is still performed, the use of coronary artery stents is much more common. Approximately 40 percent of patients treated with balloon angioplasty develope...


Nov 1, 2009 Issue
Cardiac Rehabilitation [Article]

An estimated 80 million (nearly one in three) Americans have cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the United States alone, more than 850,000 deaths are attributed annually to cardiovascular disease, and more than 8 million Americans have had a h...


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