ITEMS IN AFP WITH KEYWORD:

Infectious Disease

Mar 1, 2021 Issue
Serum Lactate Testing to Predict Mortality in Patients with Sepsis [Diagnostic Tests: What Physicians Need to Know]

Management of patients with sepsis is challenging and mortality is high. Early diagnosis and prompt initiation of therapy are essential. Higher lactate levels correlate with increased risk of mortality, particularly with lactate levels greater than 4.0 mmol per L and in the setting of hypotension.


Oct 1, 2020 Issue
Persistent Night Sweats: Diagnostic Evaluation [Article]

Night sweats are a nonspecific symptom that patients commonly experience but rarely discuss with their physicians without prompting. Conditions commonly associated with night sweats include menopause, mood disorders, gastroesophageal reflux disease, hyperthyroidism, and obesity. Serious causes should be considered when the history and physical examination do not reveal a specific cause.


Jul 15, 2020 Issue
Community-Acquired Pneumonia: Updated Recommendations from the ATS and IDSA [Practice Guidelines]

The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) recently updated their recommendations on the diagnosis and treatment of community-acquired pneumonia.


Jun 15, 2020 Issue
Management of Fever in Infants and Young Children [Article]

Febrile illness in children younger than 36 months is a concern with potentially serious consequences. Factors include poor arousability and increased respiratory effort. Urinary tract infections are the most common serious bacterial infections in these children. Antibiotic choice should reflect local patterns of microbial resistance.


Mar 1, 2020 Issue
Tuberculosis Screening, Testing, and Treatment in U.S. Health Care Professionals: CDC Releases Updated Recommendations [Practice Guidelines]

According to 1995–2007 surveillance data reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Tuberculosis Controllers Association work group, tuberculosis incidence rates in health care professionals were similar to those in the general population.


Jan 15, 2020 Issue
Short-Term Systemic Corticosteroids: Appropriate Use in Primary Care [Article]

Short-term systemic corticosteroids are frequently prescribed for adults by primary care physicians; however, short courses of the steroids are associated with adverse effects, including hyperglycemia, elevated blood pressure, mood disturbance, sepsis, and fracture. There is evidence against corticosteroid use in patients with acute bronchitis, acute sinusitis, carpal tunnel, and allergic rhinitis and for its use in patients with Bell palsy and acute gout. There is insufficient evidence supporting its use for patients with pharyngitis, lumbar radiculopathy, and herpes zoster.


Aug 1, 2019 Issue
Asthma, PAD and Cardiovascular Disease, Persons Who Inject Drugs, Crohn’s Disease, Insulin Analogs [AFP Clinical Answers]

Key clinical questions and their evidence-based answers directly from the journal’s content, written by and for family physicians.


Feb 15, 2019 Issue
Acute Hand Infections [Article]

Any trauma to the hand, particularly a penetrating trauma, may introduce damaging pathogens. Superficial infections occur in the skin and subcutaneous tissues, whereas deep infections can involve the tendon sheaths, adjacent anatomic compartments, deep fascial planes, bursae, joint spaces, and bones. Learn which conditions can be managed conservatively, when antibiotics are indicated, and which patients should be considered for surgical management.


Jul 1, 2018 Issue
Short Courses of Antibiotics as Effective as Longer Courses for Outpatient Infections [POEMs]

Just about every time someone asks, “Can I get away with a shorter course of antibiotics,” the answer is, “Yes, you can.” Shorter courses reduce cost and may reduce the likelihood of adverse events.


May 15, 2018 Issue
Infectious Diarrhea: IDSA Updates Guidelines for Diagnosis and Management [Practice Guidelines]

The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) has updated its 2001 guidelines for the management of children and adults with suspected or confirmed infectious diarrhea. Infectious diarrhea is usually self-limited, but diagnostic testing and treatment are indicated in some cases.


Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 Next


Email Alerts

Don't miss a single issue. Sign up for the free AFP email table of contents.

Sign Up Now