Pharyngitis/Sore Throat

Mar 1, 2009 Issue
Diagnosis and Treatment of Streptococcal Pharyngitis [Article]

Common signs and symptoms of streptococcal pharyngitis include sore throat, temperature greater than 100.4 degrees F (38 degrees C), tonsillar exudates, and cervical adenopathy. Cough, coryza, and diarrhea are more common with viral pharyngitis. Available diagnostic tests include throat culture and ...

Jan 15, 2008 Issue
Peritonsillar Abscess [Article]

Peritonsillar abscess remains the most common deep infection of the head and neck. The condition occurs primarily in young adults, most often during November to December and April to May, coinciding with the highest incidence of streptococcal pharyngitis and exudative tonsillitis. A peritonsillar ab...

Mar 15, 2004 Issue
Pharyngitis [Article]

Sore throat is one of the most common reasons for visits to family physicians. While most patients with sore throat have an infectious cause (pharyngitis), fewer than 20 percent have a clear indication for antibiotic therapy (i.e., group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection). Useful, well-valida...

Sep 1, 2003 Issue
Strep Throat [Point-of-Care Guides]

The probability of GABHS pharyngitis as the cause of sore throat is greatest in children younger than 15 years, especially those younger than 10.

Feb 15, 2003 Issue
Diagnosis and Management of Group A Streptococcal Pharyngitis [Practice Guidelines]

The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) recently updated a 1997 guideline for the diagnosis and management of group A streptococcal pharyngitis. The IDSA defined group A streptococcal pharyngitis as an acute infection of the oropharynx or nasopharynx that is caused by Streptococcus pyogenes.

Jan 1, 2002 Issue
Peritonsillar Abscess: Diagnosis and Treatment [Article]

Peritonsillar abscess, the most common deep infection of the head and neck that occurs in adults, is typically formed by a combination of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The presenting symptoms include fever, throat pain, and trismus. Ultrasonography and computed tomographic scanning are useful in c...

Apr 15, 2001 Issue
Management of Group A Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcal Pharyngitis [Article]

Bacteria are responsible for approximately 5 to 10 percent of pharyngitis cases, with group A beta-hemolytic streptococci being the most common bacterial etiology. A positive rapid antigen detection test may be considered definitive evidence for treatment; a negative test should be followed by a con...

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