• COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Dose Comparison Table

    Updated November 19, 2021

    All three COVID-19 vaccines can be effectively used as booster doses, and mixed and matched, for eligible populations. That means individuals can receive a different vaccine than the one they first received. Use the chart below to compare booster options for your patients. 

     

    Pfizer-BioNTech

    Moderna

    Janssen (J&J)

    Primary series
    • Licensed for individuals 16 and older
    • EUA for individuals aged 5* - 15
    • 2 doses spaced 21 days apart
    • *children aged 5-11 should receive a different formulation of the vaccine that is a different dose (10ug) and different dilution
    • EUA for individuals 18 and older
    • 2 doses spaced 28 days apart

     

    • EUA for individuals 18 and older
    • Single dose

     

    Additional dose for
    immunocompromised individuals
    Yes, at least 1 month following primary series Yes, at least 1 month following primary series No
    Boosters

    Another injection using same dose as primary series given at least 6 months after second dose. Eligible populations include:  

    • Eligible populations:
      • All adults over 18 who have completed the primary series

    Another injection with half the dose used in primary series given at least 6 months after second dose. Eligible populations include:

    • Eligible populations:
      • Adults over 18 who have completed the primary series

    Another injection using same dose as primary series given at least 2 months later. Eligible populations include:

    • All adults 18 years and older who received first dose

     

     

    Heterologous boosting (“mix and match”)

    The FDA has authorized use of a single booster dose (see above) of an authorized COVID-19 vaccine as a heterologous booster dose following completion of primary series with a different authorized COVID-19 vaccine.

    • The eligible population(s) and dosing interval for a heterologous booster dose are the same as those authorized for a booster dose of the vaccine used for primary vaccination.
    • Heterologous boosters were seen to increase antibody responses at a higher level, however, there is no effectiveness data for preventing COVID-19 disease at this time. See study results. 
    • Adverse events and reactogenicity were similar, if not lower, following a booster dose than after the second dose of the primary series. No safety concerns have been observed.
      • *The majority of people are anticipated to receive a booster dose with the same vaccine, however, there may be certain instances where supply is limited or cases where some individuals would benefit from a heterologous booster after discussing with their family physician.