• Get Started

    Step 1: Office Champtions Project Plan

    Record key elements of your project and track your progress.

    Step 2: Identify your Office and Physician Champions

    Office Champion

    The office champion plays a critical role in providing overall leadership for your practice’s efforts to improve adult immunization rates. Choose an office champion who is passionate about this patient care initiative. This person should be tasked with recommending and implementing system changes that integrate this preventive service and behavioral health change into your practice’s daily office routine.

    Physician Champion

    It is the physician champion’s role to support the team by ensuring they have adequate time and resources to carry out their work. The physician champion will provide oversight to the office champion, while allowing him or her to manage the project details. It should be a collaborative process, allowing all staff and physicians to provide input into the system changes. 

    Step 3: Form your Project Team

    While achieving practice-wide improvement requires the support and participation of everyone from physicians to front office staff, it is crucial to form a core project team to drive and monitor your improvement efforts. The team will be responsible for planning and implementing change and for measuring and reporting results.

    Team members should represent all aspects of the practice, from clinical care to office administration. The team’s size and composition can vary over time, based on the needs of your practice.

    Step 4: Select your Patient Population and Measures     

    In an effort to align with current federal reporting programs, some measures are included in the Physician Quality Reporting Program (PQRS), meaningful use (MU), and are often used by private payers. In addition, some of the measures have received endorsement by the National Quality Forum.

    PATIENT POPULATION MEASURE
    1. All adult patients 19 years of age and older Percentage of patients 19 years of age and older who received the influenza vaccine for the influenza season.
    2. All adult patients 61 years of age and older Percentage of patients 61 years of age and older who have received a single dose of the zoster vaccine.
    3. All adult patients 66 years of age and older Percentage of patients 66 years of age and older who have received one dose of PCV13.
    4. All adult patients 66 years of age and older Percentage of patients 66 years of age and older who have received one dose of PPSV23.