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Febrile Seizures: Risks, Evaluation, and Prognosis - American Family Physician

Jan 15, 2012 - Febrile seizures are common in the first five years of life, and many factors that increase seizure risk have been identified. Initial evaluation should determine whether features of a complex seizure are present and identify the source of fever. Routine blood tests, neuroimaging, and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2012/0115/p149.html

Neonatal Resuscitation: An Update - American Family Physician

Apr 15, 2011 - Appropriate resuscitation must be available for each of the more than 4 million infants born annually in the United States. Ninety percent of infants transition safely, and it is up to the physician to assess risk factors, identify the nearly 10 percent of infants who need ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0415/p911.html

Evaluation of Short and Tall Stature in Children - American Family Physician

Sep 1, 2008 - Children and adolescents whose heights and growth velocities deviate from the normal percentiles on standard growth charts present a special challenge to physicians. Height that is less than the 3rd percentile or greater than the 97th percentile is deemed short or tall stature, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0901/p597.html

Respiratory Distress in the Newborn - American Family Physician

Oct 1, 2007 - The most common etiology of neonatal respiratory distress is transient tachypnea of the newborn; this is triggered by excessive lung fluid, and symptoms usually resolve spontaneously. Respiratory distress syndrome can occur in premature infants as a result of surfactant deficiency and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/1001/p987.html

Common Tinea Infections in Children - American Family Physician

May 15, 2008 - The common dermatophyte genera Trichophyton, Microsporum, and Epidermophyton are major causes of superficial fungal infections in children. These infections (e.g., tinea corporis, pedis, cruris, and unguium) are typically acquired directly from contact with infected humans or animals or...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0515/p1415.html

Prevention of Unintentional Childhood Injury - American Family Physician

Apr 1, 2013 - Unintentional injury accounts for 40 percent of childhood deaths annually, most commonly from motor vehicle crashes. The proper use of child restraints is the most effective strategy to prevent injury or death. Motor vehicle restraint guidelines have recently been revised to an ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2013/0401/p502.html

A Practical Approach to Neonatal Jaundice - American Family Physician

May 1, 2008 - Kernicterus and neurologic sequelae caused by severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia are preventable conditions. A structured and practical approach to the identification and care of infants with jaundice can facilitate prevention, thus decreasing rates of morbidity and mortality. Primary ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0501/p1255.html

Health Maintenance in School-aged Children: Part I. History, Physical Examination, ...

Mar 15, 2011 - The goals of the well-child examination in school-aged children (kindergarten through early adolescence) are promoting health, detecting disease, and counseling to prevent injury and future health problems. A complete history should address any concerns from the patient and family and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0315/p683.html

Screening for Developmental Delay - American Family Physician

Sep 1, 2011 - According to the literature, 12 to 16 percent of children in the United States have at least one developmental delay, yet as many as one-half of affected children will not be identified by the time they enter kindergarten. If developmental delays are detected too late, opportunities for...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0901/p544.html

Infant Formula - American Family Physician

Apr 1, 2009 - Although the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Physicians recommend breast milk for optimal infant nutrition, many parents still choose formula as an acceptable alternative. The wide variety of available formulas is confusing to parents and physicians, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/0401/p565.html

The Abnormal Fontanel - American Family Physician

Jun 15, 2003 - The diagnosis of an abnormal fontanel requires an understanding of the wide variation of normal. At birth, an infant has six fontanels. The anterior fontanel is the largest and most important for clinical evaluation. The average size of the anterior fontanel is 2.1 cm, and the median ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/0615/p2547.html

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders - American Family Physician

Jul 15, 2005 - To complement the 2005 Annual Clinical Focus on medical genomics, AFP will be publishing a series of short reviews on genetic syndromes. This series was designed to increase awareness of these diseases so that family physicians can recognize and diagnose children with these disorders ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0715/p279.html

Caring for Pregnant Women and Newborns with Hepatitis B or C - American Family Physician

Nov 15, 2010 - Family physicians encounter diagnostic and treatment issues when caring for pregnant women with hepatitis B or C and their newborns. When hepatitis B virus is perinatally acquired, an infant has approximately a 90 percent chance of becoming a chronic carrier and, when chronically ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/1115/p1225.html

Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Children - American Family Physician

Jan 15, 2011 - Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an RNA virus that causes respiratory tract infections in children. In the North- ern Hemisphere, the peak infection season is November through April. By two years of age, most children will have had an RSV infection. Bronchiolitis, a lower ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0115/p141.html

Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis: Diagnosis and Management - American Family Physician

Aug 1, 2010 - Slipped capital femoral epiphysis is the most common hip disorder in adolescents, and it has a prevalence of 10.8 cases per 100,000 children. It usually occurs in children eight to 15 years of age, and it is one of the most commonly missed diagnoses in children. Slipped capital femoral ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/0801/p258.html

Health Maintenance in School-aged Children: Part II. Counseling Recommendations - ...

Mar 15, 2011 - School-aged children (kindergarten through early adolescence) are establishing patterns of behavior that may last a lifetime; therefore, it is important to counsel these patients about healthy lifestyle practices during well-child examinations. Children and families should be advised to...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0315/p689.html

Hyperbilirubinemia in the Term Newborn - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2002 - Hyperbilirubinemia is one of the most common problems encountered in term newborns. Historically, management guidelines were derived from studies on bilirubin toxicity in infants with hemolytic disease. More recent recommendations support the use of less intensive therapy in healthy ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0215/p599.html

Lead Poisoning in Children - American Family Physician

Mar 15, 2010 - The prevalence and severity of childhood lead poisoning have been greatly reduced since the removal of lead from paint and gasoline in the 1970s. Despite these efforts, approximately 310,000 U.S. children younger than five years have elevated blood lead levels. Health care professionals...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/0315/p751.html

Oppositional Defiant Disorder - American Family Physician

Oct 1, 2008 - Oppositional defiant disorder is defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed., as a recurrent pattern of developmentally inappropriate, negativistic, defiant, and disobedient behavior toward authority figures. This behavior often appears in the preschool...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/1001/p861.html

Evaluation and Treatment of Enuresis - American Family Physician

Aug 15, 2008 - Enuresis is defined as repeated, spontaneous voiding of urine during sleep in a child five years or older. It affects 5 to 7 million children in the United States. Primary nocturnal enuresis is caused by a disparity between bladder capacity and nocturnal urine production and failure of ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0815/p489.html

Evaluation and Treatment of Constipation in Infants and Children - American Family ...

Feb 1, 2006 - Constipation in children usually is functional and the result of stool retention. However, family physicians must be alert for red flags that may indicate the presence of an uncommon but serious organic cause of constipation, such as Hirschsprung's disease (congenital aganglionic ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0201/p469.html

Toilet Training - American Family Physician

Nov 1, 2008 - Toilet training is a developmental task that impacts families with small children. All healthy children are eventually toilet trained, and most complete the task without medical intervention. Most research on toilet training is descriptive, although some is evidence based. In the United...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/1101/p1059.html

Newborn Skin: Part II. Birthmarks - American Family Physician

Jan 1, 2008 - Birthmarks in newborns are common sources of parental concern. Although most treatment recommendations are based on expert opinion, limited evidence exists to guide management of these conditions. Large congenital melanocytic nevi require evaluation for removal, whereas smaller nevi may...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0101/p56.html

The Diagnosis of Wheezing in Children - American Family Physician

Apr 15, 2008 - Wheezing in children is a common problem encountered by family physicians. Approximately 25 to 30 percent of infants will have at least one wheezing episode, and nearly one half of children have a history of wheezing by six years of age. The most common causes of wheezing in children ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0415/p1109.html

Pregnancy Prevention in Adolescents - American Family Physician

Oct 15, 2004 - Although the pregnancy rate in adolescents has declined steadily in the past 10 years, it remains a major public health problem with lasting repercussions for the teenage mothers, their infants and families, and society as a whole. Successful strategies to prevent adolescent pregnancy ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/1015/p1517.html

Primary Care for Children with Autism - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2010 - The earliest sign of autism in children is the delayed attainment of social skill milestones, including joint attention, social orienting, and pretend play. Language impairment is a common, but less specific, sign of autism. Repetitive behaviors and restricted interests may not be noted...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/0215/p453.html

Stuttering: An Overview - American Family Physician

May 1, 2008 - Speech dysfluency (stuttering) is common in children. Although stuttering often resolves before adulthood, it can cause significant anxiety for children and their families. Stuttering speech patterns are often easily identifiable; when a child is learning to talk, repetition of sounds ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0501/p1271.html

Identification and Evaluation of Mental Retardation - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2000 - Mental retardation in young children is often missed by clinicians. The condition is present in 2 to 3 percent of the population, either as an isolated finding or as part of a syndrome or broader disorder. Causes of mental retardation are numerous and include genetic and environmental ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2000/0215/p1059.html

Hirschsprung's Disease: Diagnosis and Management - American Family Physician

Oct 15, 2006 - Hirschsprung's disease (congenital megacolon) is caused by the failed migration of colonic ganglion cells during gestation. Varying lengths of the distal colon are unable to relax, causing functional colonic obstruction. Hirschsprung's disease most commonly involves the rectosigmoid ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/1015/p1319.html

Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip - American Family Physician

Oct 15, 2006 - Developmental dysplasia of the hip refers to a continuum of abnormalities in the immature hip that can range from subtle dysplasia to dislocation. The identification of risk factors, including breech presentation and family history, should heighten a physician's suspicion of ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/1015/p1310.html

Evaluation and Management of Common Childhood Poisonings - American Family Physician

Mar 1, 2009 - Family physicians often manage substance ingestions in children, most of which are nontoxic in nature. Physicians should know the phone number of the poison control center, understand the appropriate initial assessment of suspected toxin ingestion, and recognize important toxidromes. ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/0301/p397.html

Kawasaki Disease: Summary of the American Heart Association Guidelines - American ...

Oct 1, 2006 - Kawasaki disease is an acute vasculitis of childhood that predominantly affects the coronary arteries. The etiology of Kawasaki disease remains unknown, although an infectious agent is strongly suspected based on clinical and epidemiologic features. A genetic predisposition is also ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/1001/p1141.html

Evaluation of Back Pain in Children and Adolescents - American Family Physician

Dec 1, 2007 - Back pain is fairly prevalent in healthy children and adolescents. When children or adolescents seek medical care for back pain, it is highly likely that underlying pathology will be identified. Common causes of back pain include nonspecific pain or muscle strain, herniated disk, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/1201/p1669.html

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome - American Family Physician

May 15, 2009 - Sudden infant death syndrome is the leading cause of death among healthy infants, affecting 0.57 per 1,000 live births. The most easily modifiable risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome is sleeping position. To reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome, parents should be ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/0515/p870.html

Acute Abdominal Pain in Children - American Family Physician

Jun 1, 2003 - Acute abdominal pain in children presents a diagnostic dilemma. Although many cases of acute abdominal pain are benign, some require rapid diagnosis and treatment to minimize morbidity. Numerous disorders can cause abdominal pain. The most common medical cause is gastroenteritis, and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/0601/p2321.html

Cerebral Palsy: An Overview - American Family Physician

Jan 1, 2006 - The presentation of cerebral palsy can be global mental and physical dysfunction or isolated disturbances in gait, cognition, growth, or sensation. It is the most common childhood physical disability and affects 2 to 2.5 children per 1,000 born in the United States. The differential ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0101/p91.html

Counseling on Early Childhood Concerns: Sleep Issues, Thumb Sucking, Picky Eating, and ...

Jul 15, 2009 - Sleep issues, thumb sucking, coping with picky eating, and determining if a child is ready for school are common concerns of families with young children. Information and resources to help counsel on these topics include recommendations from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, the ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/0715/p139.html

Tourette's Syndrome - American Family Physician

Mar 1, 2008 - Tourette's syndrome is a movement disorder most commonly seen in school-age children. The incidence peaks around preadolescence with one half of cases resolving in early adulthood. Tourette's syndrome is the most common cause of tics, which are involuntary or semivoluntary, sudden, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0301/p651.html

The Newborn Foot - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2004 - An examination of the feet is an essential component of an evaluation of a newborn. A thorough examination can be performed quickly. Despite its small size, the newborn foot is a complex structure. Most deformities can be diagnosed easily with physical examination alone, using few ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/0215/p865.html

Current Strategies in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Childhood ...

Apr 15, 2009 - Symptoms of childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder affect cognitive, academic, behavioral, emotional, social, and developmental functioning. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is the most commonly diagnosed neurodevelopmental disorder in children and adolescents. An ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/0415/p657.html

Heart Murmurs in Pediatric Patients: When Do You Refer? - American Family Physician

Aug 1, 1999 - Many normal children have heart murmurs, but most children do not have heart disease. An appropriate history and a properly conducted physical examination can identify children at increased risk for significant heart disease. Pathologic causes of systolic murmurs include atrial and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0801/p558.html

Urinary Tract Infection in Children - American Family Physician

Dec 15, 2005 - Up to 7 percent of girls and 2 percent of boys will have a symptomatic, culture-confirmed urinary tract infection by six years of age. Urinary tract infection may be suspected because of urinary symptoms in older children or because of fever, nonspecific symptoms, or failure to thrive ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/1215/p2483.html

Evaluating Obesity and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Children and Adolescents - ...

Nov 1, 2008 - Obesity continues to be a growing public health problem. According to the 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 17 percent of persons two to 19 years of age are overweight. The number of obese children and adolescents has tripled in the past 20 years. Obesity in ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/1101/p1052.html

Outpatient Care of the Premature Infant - American Family Physician

Oct 15, 2007 - An increasing number of infants in the United States are born prematurely, with current statistics estimating about 13 percent of all births. Although survival rates and outcomes for premature infants have dramatically improved in recent decades, morbidity and mortality are still ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/1015/p1159.html

Clinical Presentations of Parvovirus B19 Infection - American Family Physician

Feb 1, 2007 - Although most persons with parvovirus B19 infection are asymptomatic or have mild, nonspecific, cold-like symptoms, several clinical conditions have been linked to the virus. Parvovirus B19 usually infects children and causes the classic

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0201/p373.html

Strategies for Breastfeeding Success - American Family Physician

Jul 15, 2008 - Breastfeeding provides significant health benefits for infants and mothers. However, the United States continues to fall short of the breastfeeding goals set by the Healthy People 2010 initiative. The American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0715/p225.html

Childhood Obesity: Highlights of AMA Expert Committee Recommendations - American Family...

Jul 1, 2008 - Childhood obesity is an increasingly serious problem; 13.9 percent of children two to five years of age, 18.8 percent of children six to 11 years of age, and 17.4 percent of adolescents 12 to 19 years of age in America are obese. Practical strategies that primary care physicians can use...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0701/p56.html

Evaluating the Child for Sexual Abuse - American Family Physician

Mar 1, 2001 - Child victims of sexual abuse may present with physical findings that can include anogenital problems, enuresis or encopresis. Behavioral changes may involve sexual acting out, aggression, depression, eating disturbances and regression. Because the examination findings of most child ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0301/p883.html

Expanded Newborn Screening: Information and Resources for the Family Physician - ...

Apr 1, 2008 - Family physicians treat an increasing number of children with metabolic disorders identified through newborn screening, and they are often the first line of defense in responding to an abnormal screening result. How the family physician chooses to interpret information from the ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0401/p987.html

Nocturnal Enuresis - American Family Physician

Apr 1, 2003 - Nocturnal enuresis is a common problem that can be troubling for children and their families. Recent studies indicate that nocturnal enuresis is best regarded as a group of conditions with different etiologies. A genetic component is likely in many affected children. Research also ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/0401/p1499.html

Update on Immunizations in Children and Adolescents - American Family Physician

Jun 1, 2008 - Over the past few years, there have been many changes to the recommendations for children and adolescents by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. These include dividing the immunization schedule into two parts (i.e., ages birth to six years and seven to 18 years, with ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0601/p1561.html

Reducing Tobacco Use in Adolescents - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2008 - After steadily decreasing since the late 1990s, adolescent smoking rates have stabilized at levels well above national goals. Experts recommend screening for tobacco use and exposure at every patient visit, although evidence of improved outcomes in adolescents is lacking. Counseling ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0215/p483.html

Child Abuse: Approach and Management - American Family Physician

Jan 15, 2007 - Child abuse is a common diagnosis in the United States and should be considered any time neglect or emotional, physical, or sexual abuse is a possibility. Although home visitation programs have been effective in preventing child maltreatment, much of the approach to and management of ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0115/p221.html

Adolescent Substance Use and Abuse: Recognition and Management - American Family Physician

Feb 1, 2008 - Substance abuse in adolescents is undertreated in the United States. Family physicians are well positioned to recognize substance use in their patients and to take steps to address the issue before use escalates. Comorbid mental disorders among adolescents with substance abuse include ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0201/p331.html

Discharge Procedures for Healthy Newborns - American Family Physician

Mar 1, 2006 - Physicians should use a checklist to facilitate discussions with new parents before discharging their healthy newborn from the hospital. The checklist should include information on breastfeeding, warning signs of illness, and ways to keep the child healthy and safe. Physicians can ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0301/p849.html

Inborn Errors of Metabolism in Infancy and Early Childhood: An Update - American Family...

Jun 1, 2006 - Recent innovations in medical technology have changed newborn screening programs in the United States. The widespread use of tandem mass spectrometry is helping to identify more inborn errors of metabolism. Primary care physicians often are the first to be contacted by state and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0601/p1981.html

Foreign Body Ingestion in Children - American Family Physician

Jul 15, 2005 - Because many patients who have swallowed foreign bodies are asymptomatic, physicians must maintain a high index of suspicion. The majority of ingested foreign bodies pass spontaneously, but serious complications, such as bowel perforation and obstruction, can occur. Foreign bodies ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0715/p287.html

Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Infants and Children - American Family Physician

Sep 1, 2004 - Community-acquired pneumonia is one of the most common serious infections in children, with an annual incidence of 34 to 40 cases per 1,000 children in Europe and North America. When diagnosing community-acquired pneumonia, physicians should rely mainly on the patient's history and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/0901/p899.html

Nutrition in Toddlers - American Family Physician

Nov 1, 2006 - Toddlers make a transition from dependent milk-fed infancy to independent feeding and a typical omnivorous diet. This stage is an important time for physicians to monitor growth using growth charts and body mass index and to make recommendations for healthy eating. Fat and cholesterol ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/1101/p1527.html

Childhood and Adolescent Depression - American Family Physician

Jan 1, 2007 - Major depression affects 3 to 5 percent of children and adolescents. Depression negatively impacts growth and development, school performance, and peer or family relationships and may lead to suicide. Biomedical and psychosocial risk factors include a family history of depression, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0101/p73.html

Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain in Children: Part I. Initial Evaluation - American Family ...

Jul 1, 2006 - Musculoskeletal pain can be difficult for children to characterize. Primary care physicians must determine whether the pain may be caused by a systemic disease. Change in activity, constitutional symptoms such as fevers and fatigue, or abnormal examination findings without obvious ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0701/p115.html

Amblyopia - American Family Physician

Feb 1, 2007 - Amblyopia, a decrease in visual acuity, is a major public health problem with a prevalence of 1 to 4 percent in the United States. It is thought to develop early in life during the critical period of visual development. Early recognition of amblyogenic risk factors such as strabismus, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0201/p361.html

Evaluating Fever of Unidentifiable Source in Young Children - American Family Physician

Jun 15, 2007 - Most children will have been evaluated for a febrile illness by 36 months of age. Although the majority will have a self-limited viral illness, studies done before the use of Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae vaccines showed that approximately 10 percent of ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0615/p1805.html

Management of Type 2 Diabetes in Youth: An Update - American Family Physician

Sep 1, 2007 - Although type 1 diabetes historically has been more common in patients eight to 19 years of age, type 2 diabetes is emerging as an important disease in this group. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 8 to 45 percent of new childhood diabetes. This article is an update from the National ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0901/p658.html

Prevention of Unintentional Childhood Injuries - American Family Physician

Dec 1, 2006 - Injuries are the leading cause of death in children and teenagers in the United States. The leading causes of unintentional injury vary by age and include drowning, poisoning, suffocation, fires, burns, falls, and motor vehicle, bicycle, and pedestrian-related crashes. Most injuries are...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/1201/p1864.html

Evaluation and Treatment of the Child with Febrile Seizure - American Family Physician

May 15, 2006 - Up to 5 percent of children in North America and western Europe experience at least one episode of febrile seizure before six years of age. Most of these seizures are self-limited and patients do not require treatment. Continuous therapy after the seizure is not effective in reducing ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0515/p1761.html

Hypertension in Children and Adolescents - American Family Physician

May 1, 2006 - The development of a national database on normative blood pressure levels throughout childhood has contributed to the recognition of elevated blood pressure in children and adolescents. The epidemic of childhood obesity, the risk of developing left ventricular hypertrophy, and evidence ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0501/p1558.html

Rickets: Not a Disease of the Past - American Family Physician

Aug 15, 2006 - Rickets develops when growing bones fail to mineralize. In most cases, the diagnosis is established with a thorough history and physical examination and confirmed by laboratory evaluation. Nutritional rickets can be caused by inadequate intake of nutrients (vitamin D in particular); ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0815/p619.html

Universal Newborn Hearing Screening - American Family Physician

May 1, 2007 - Congenital hearing loss is estimated to affect one in every 1,000 newborns. Causes of hearing loss can be conductive, sensorineural, mixed, or central. Known risk factors for congenital hearing loss include cytomegalovirus infection and premature birth necessitating a stay in the ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0501/p1349.html

Evaluation of Children with Reading Difficulties - American Family Physician

Dec 15, 2006 - Reading difficulties are common and are associated with poor long-term academic achievement. Evaluation of a child's developmental, educational, and family histories in conjunction with standardized screening tests (e.g., Ages and Stages Questionnaires, Parents' Evaluation of ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/1215/p2079.html

Craniosynostosis - American Family Physician

Jun 15, 2004 - Skull deformity in infants continues to be a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Deformational plagiocephaly is a common and somewhat benign cause of skull deformity in infants that must be distinguished from the more serious craniosynostosis, which occurs alone or as a syndrome. ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/0615/p2863.html

Diagnosis and Management of Positional Head Deformity - American Family Physician

May 1, 2003 - In children with positional head deformity (posterior plagiocephaly), the occiput is flattened with corresponding facial asymmetry. The incidence of positional head deformity increased dramatically between 1992 and 1999, and now occurs in one of every 60 live births. One proposed cause ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/0501/p1953.html

Promoting Medication Adherence in Children - American Family Physician

Sep 1, 2006 - The problem of getting children to follow a treatment regimen is widespread and is frustrating for physicians. The extent to which any patient adheres to a medical regimen is an essential determinant of clinical success. Strategies to improve adherence in children include using ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0901/p793.html

Bilious Vomiting in the Newborn: Rapid Diagnosis of Intestinal Obstruction - American ...

May 1, 2000 - Bilious vomiting in newborns is an urgent condition that requires the immediate involvement of a team of pediatric surgeons and neonatologists for perioperative management. However, initial detection, evaluation and treatment are often performed by nurses, family physicians and general ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2000/0501/p2791.html

Preventive Health Counseling for Adolescents - American Family Physician

Oct 1, 2006 - The leading causes of adolescent mortality are accidents (death from unintentional injury), homicide, and suicide. Additional morbidity is related to drug, tobacco, and alcohol use; risky sexual behaviors; poor nutrition; and inadequate physical activity. One third of adolescents engage...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/1001/p1151.html

Failure to Pass Meconium: Diagnosing Neonatal Intestinal Obstruction - American Family ...

Nov 1, 1999 - Timely passage of the first stool is a hallmark of the well-being of the newborn infant. Failure of a full-term newborn to pass meconium in the first 24 hours may signal intestinal obstruction. Lower intestinal obstruction may be associated with disorders such as Hirschsprung's disease,...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/1101/p2043.html

Management of Acute Gastroenteritis in Children - American Family Physician

Dec 1, 1999 - Acute gastroenteritis is a common and costly clinical problem in children. It is a largely self-limited disease with many etiologies. The evaluation of the child with acute gastroenteritis requires a careful history and a complete physical examination to uncover other illnesses with ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/1201/p2555.html

Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children - American Family Physician

Mar 1, 2004 - Obstructive sleep-disordered breathing is common in children. From 3 percent to 12 percent of children snore, while obstructive sleep apnea syndrome affects 1 percent to 10 percent of children. The majority of these children have mild symptoms, and many outgrow the condition. ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/0301/p1147.html

Evaluation and Management of the Child with Speech Delay - American Family Physician

Jun 1, 1999 - A delay in speech development may be a symptom of many disorders, including mental retardation, hearing loss, an expressive language disorder, psychosocial deprivation, autism, elective mutism, receptive aphasia and cerebral palsy. Speech delay may be secondary to maturation delay or ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0601/p3121.html

Childhood and Adolescent Sports-Related Overuse Injuries - American Family Physician

Mar 15, 2006 - Youth sports participation carries an inherent risk of injury, including overuse injuries. Little leaguer's shoulder, a stress fracture of the proximal humerus that presents as lateral shoulder pain, usually is self-limited. Little leaguer's elbow is a medial stress injury; treatment ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0315/p1014.html

Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain in Children: Part II. Rheumatic Causes - American Family ...

Jul 15, 2006 - Primary care physicians should have a working knowledge of rheumatic diseases of childhood that manifest primarily as musculoskeletal pain. Children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis can present with painless joint inflammation and may have normal results on rheumatologic tests. ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0715/p293.html

Infantile Colic - American Family Physician

Aug 15, 2004 - Infantile colic can be distressing to parents whose infant is inconsolable during crying episodes. Colic is often defined by the 'rule of three': crying for more than three hours per day, for more than three days per week, and for longer than three weeks in an infant who is well-fed and...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/0815/p735.html

Prevention of Group B Streptococcal Disease in the Newborn - American Family Physician

Mar 1, 2005 - Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among newborns. Universal screening for GBS among women at 35 to 37 weeks of gestation is more effective than administration of intrapartum antibiotics based on risk factors. Lower vaginal and rectal cultures for ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0301/p903.html

Retinoblastoma - American Family Physician

Mar 15, 2006 - Retinoblastoma, a neuroblastic tumor, is the most common primary intraocular malignancy of childhood. Patients usually present with leukokoria (white reflex or white pupil), detected in primary care. The mean age at diagnosis is 12 months for bilateral tumors and 24 months for ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0315/p1039.html

Childhood Asthma: Treatment Update - American Family Physician

May 15, 2005 - The prevalence of childhood asthma has risen significantly over the past four decades. A family history of atopic disease is associated with an increased likelihood of developing asthma, and environmental triggers such as tobacco smoke significantly increase the severity of daily asthma...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0515/p1959.html

Conduct Disorder: Diagnosis and Treatment In Primary Care - American Family Physician

Apr 15, 2001 - Conduct disorder is a common childhood psychiatric problem that has an increased incidence in adolescence. The primary diagnostic features of conduct disorder include aggression, theft, vandalism, violations of rules and/or lying. For a diagnosis, these behaviors must occur for at least...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0415/p1579.html

Management of Newborns Exposed to Maternal HIV Infection - American Family Physician

May 15, 2002 - The management of infants whose mothers are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) involves minimizing the risk of vertical transmission of HIV, recognizing neonatal HIV infection early, preventing opportunistic infections, and addressing psychosocial issues. Maternal ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0515/p2049.html

Diagnosis of Stridor in Children - American Family Physician

Nov 15, 1999 - Stridor is a sign of upper airway obstruction. In children, laryngomalacia is the most common cause of chronic stridor, while croup is the most common cause of acute stridor. Generally, an inspiratory stridor suggests airway obstruction above the glottis while an expiratory stridor is ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/1115/p2289.html

Lower Extremity Abnormalities in Children - American Family Physician

Aug 1, 2003 - Rotational and angular problems are two types of lower extremity abnormalities common in children. Rotational problems include intoeing and out-toeing. Intoeing is caused by one of three types of deformity: metatarsus adductus, internal tibial torsion, and increased femoral anteversion....

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/0801/p461.html

Evaluation and Management of Apparent Life-Threatening Events in Children - American ...

Jun 15, 2005 - Apparent life-threatening event syndrome predominantly affects children younger than one year. This syndrome is characterized by a frightening constellation of symptoms in which the child exhibits some combination of apnea, change in color, change in muscle tone, coughing, or gagging. ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0615/p2301.html

The Newborn Examination: Part I. Emergencies and Common Abnormalities Involving the ...

Jan 1, 2002 - The routine newborn assessment should include an examination for size, macrocephaly or microcephaly, changes in skin color, signs of birth trauma, malformations, evidence of respiratory distress, level of arousal, posture, tone, presence of spontaneous movements, and symmetry of ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0101/p61.html

Child Safety Seat Counseling: Three Keys to Safety - American Family Physician

Aug 1, 2005 - The number one cause of death for children younger than 14 years is vehicular injury. Child safety seats and automobile safety belts protect children in a crash if they are used correctly, but if a child does not fit in the restraint correctly, it can lead to injury. A child safety seat...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0801/p473.html

Anemia in Children - American Family Physician

Oct 15, 2001 - Anemia in children is commonly encountered by the family physician. Multiple causes exist, but with a thorough history, a physical examination and limited laboratory evaluation a specific diagnosis can usually be established. The use of the mean corpuscular volume to classify the anemia...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/1015/p1379.html

A Practical Guide to Infant Oral Health - American Family Physician

Dec 1, 2004 - Early childhood caries is the most common chronic disease in young children and may develop as soon as teeth erupt. Bacteria, predominately mutans streptococci, metabolize simple sugars to produce acid that demineralizes teeth, resulting in cavities. Physicians should examine children's...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/1201/p2113.html

Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infections - American Family Physician

Mar 15, 2002 - Neonatal herpes simplex virus infections can result in serious morbidity and mortality. Many of the infections result from asymptomatic cervical shedding of virus after a primary episode of genital HSV in the third trimester. Antibodies to HSV-2 have been detected in approximately 20 ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0315/p1138.html

The Gomco Circumcision: Common Problems and Solutions - American Family Physician

Sep 15, 1998 - Circumcision performed using the Gomco clamp is usually quick and effective, and results in very little bleeding. However, every clinician performing circumcision occasionally has concerns or questions regarding the procedure. Some of the more common concerns regarding the use of the ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0915/p891.html

Failure to Thrive - American Family Physician

Sep 1, 2003 - Failure to thrive is a condition commonly seen by primary care physicians. Prompt diagnosis and intervention are important for preventing malnutrition and developmental sequelae. Medical and social factors often contribute to failure to thrive. Either extreme of parental attention ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/0901/p879.html

Chronic Abdominal Pain in Childhood: Diagnosis and Management - American Family Physician

Apr 1, 1999 - More than one third of children complain of abdominal pain lasting two weeks or longer. The diagnostic approach to abdominal pain in children relies heavily on the history provided by the parent and child to direct a step-wise approach to investigation. If the history and physical ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0401/p1823.html

Childhood Bullying: Implications for Physicians - American Family Physician

Nov 1, 2004 - Childhood bullying has potentially serious implications for bullies and their targets. Bullying involves a pattern of repeated aggression, a deliberate intent to harm or disturb a victim despite the victim's apparent distress, and a real or perceived imbalance of power. Bullying can ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/1101/p1723.html

School Refusal in Children and Adolescents - American Family Physician

Oct 15, 2003 - School refusal is a problem that is stressful for children, families, and school personnel. Failing to attend school has significant short- and long-term effects on children's social, emotional, and educational development. School refusal often is associated with comorbid psychiatric ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/1015/p1555.html

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