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Evaluating the Child with Purpura - American Family Physician

Aug 1, 2001 - Purpura is the result of hemorrhage into the skin or mucosal membrane. It may represent a relatively benign condition or herald the presence of a serious underlying disorder. Purpura may be secondary to thrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction, coagulation factor deficiency or vascular ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0801/p419.html

Evaluation of the Acutely Limping Child - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2000 - A limp may be defined as any asymmetric deviation from a normal gait pattern. The differential diagnosis of a limp includes trauma, infection, neoplasia and inflammatory, congenital, neuromuscular or developmental disorders. Initially, a broad differential diagnosis should be considered...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2000/0215/p1011.html

Issues in Newborn Screening for Phenylketonuria - American Family Physician

Oct 1, 1999 - The blood sample for phenylketonuria (PKU) screening should be obtained at least 12 hours after the infant's birth. Newborn screening for PKU has largely eliminated mental retardation caused by this disease. If the first phenylalanine test demonstrates positive results, a repeat test ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/1001/p1462.html

Disorders of Puberty - American Family Physician

Jul 1, 1999 - Normal puberty begins between eight and 14 years of age in girls and between nine and 14 years of age in boys. Pubic hair distribution is used to stage puberty, along with breast size and contour in girls and testicular volume in boys. Some children experience constitutional sexual ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0701/p209.html

Urinary Tract Infections in Children: Why They Occur and How to Prevent Them - American...

May 15, 1998 - Urinary tract infections (UTIs) usually occur as a consequence of colonization of the periurethral area by a virulent organism that subsequently gains access to the bladder. During the first few months of life, uncircumcised male infants are at increased risk for UTIs, but thereafter ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0515/p2440.html

Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: Review and Current Concepts - American Family Physician

Jul 1, 2001 - Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is present in 2 to 4 percent of children between 10 and 16 years of age. It is defined as a lateral curvature of the spine greater than 10 degrees accompanied by vertebral rotation. It is thought to be a multigene dominant condition with variable ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0701/p111.html

Caring for Infants with Congenital Heart Disease and Their Families - American Family ...

Apr 1, 1999 - Congenital heart defects are classified into two broad categories: acyanotic and cyanotic lesions. The most common acyanotic lesions are ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, atrioventricular canal, pulmonary stenosis, patent ductus arteriosus, aortic stenosis and coarctation...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0401/p1857.html

Congenital Toxoplasmosis - American Family Physician

May 15, 2003 - Approximately 85 percent of women of childbearing age in the United States are susceptible to acute infection with the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Transmission of T. gondii to the fetus can result in serious health problems, including mental retardation, seizures, blindness, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/0515/p2131.html

Primary Prevention of Child Abuse - American Family Physician

Mar 15, 1999 - In 1993, the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect declared a child protection emergency. Between 1985 and 1993, there was a 50 percent increase in reported cases of child abuse. Three million cases of child abuse are reported in the United States each year. Treatment of the ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0315/p1577.html

Prevention and Treatment of Overweight in Children and Adolescents - American Family ...

Jun 1, 2004 - Overweight in childhood and adolescence is an important public health issue because of its rapidly increasing prevalence and associated adverse medical and social consequences. Recent studies have estimated that 15 percent of children in the United States are at risk for overweight, and...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2004/0601/p2591.html

Evaluating Proteinuria in Children - American Family Physician

Oct 1, 1998 - Proteinuria is a common laboratory finding in children. It can be identified as either a transient or a persistent finding and can represent a benign condition or a serious disease. A rapid but qualitative assessment of proteinuria can be made using dipstick or sulfosalicylic acid ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/1001/p1145.html

Sleep Disorders and Sleep Problems in Childhood - American Family Physician

Jan 15, 2001 - Sleep problems are common in childhood. A distinction is made between problems in which polysomnography is abnormal (i.e., the parasomnias, sleep apnea and narcolepsy) and problems that are behavioral in origin and have normal polysomnography. The parasomnias--sleep terrors, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0115/p277.html

Primary Care of Infants and Young Children with Down Syndrome - American Family Physician

Jan 15, 1999 - Down syndrome is caused by triplicate material of chromosome 21. The syndrome has a variable physical expression, but congenital cardiac defects, transient myelodysplasia of the newborn and duodenal atresia are highly specific for this chromosomal disorder. Routine health maintenance is...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0115/p381.html

Diagnosis and Management of Positional Head Deformity - American Family Physician

May 1, 2003 - In children with positional head deformity (posterior plagiocephaly), the occiput is flattened with corresponding facial asymmetry. The incidence of positional head deformity increased dramatically between 1992 and 1999, and now occurs in one of every 60 live births. One proposed cause ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/0501/p1953.html

The Newborn Examination: Part I. Emergencies and Common Abnormalities Involving the ...

Jan 1, 2002 - The routine newborn assessment should include an examination for size, macrocephaly or microcephaly, changes in skin color, signs of birth trauma, malformations, evidence of respiratory distress, level of arousal, posture, tone, presence of spontaneous movements, and symmetry of ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0101/p61.html

Evaluation of Clumsiness in Children - American Family Physician

Oct 15, 2002 - Parents and physicians often dismiss seemingly minor motor difficulties in children. Approximately 6 percent of school-aged children have coordination problems serious enough to interfere with academic performance and social integration. These problems often arise during the early ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/1015/p1435.html

Double-Ligature: A Treatment for Pedunculated Umbilical Granulomas in Children - ...

May 15, 2002 - Umbilical granulomas are common inflammatory reactions to the resolving umbilical stump. The double-ligature technique is simple to perform and provides good cosmetic and functional results with only minor complications. The granuloma becomes necrotic and drops off within seven to 14 ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0515/p2067.html

Evaluation and Treatment of Childhood Obesity - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 1999 - The prevalence of childhood obesity in the United States has risen dramatically in the past several decades. Although 25 to 30 percent of children are affected, this condition is underdiagnosed and undertreated. Hormonal and genetic factors are rarely the cause of childhood obesity; ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0215/p861.html

Assessment of Abnormal Growth Curves - American Family Physician

Jul 1, 1998 - An important part of well-child care is the assessment of a child's growth. While growth in the vast majority of children falls within normal percentile ranges on standard growth curves, an occasional child demonstrates worrisome deviations in weight, height or head size. A single ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0701/p153.html

Osteochondritis Dissecans: A Diagnosis Not to Miss - American Family Physician

Jan 1, 2000 - Osteochondritis dissecans is the most common cause of a loose body in the joint space in adolescent patients. Because clinical findings are often subtle, diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. Limited range of motion may be the only notable clinical sign. The diagnosis is made by...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2000/0101/p151.html

Childhood Pancreatitis - American Family Physician

May 1, 1999 - Acute pancreatitis is a rare finding in childhood but probably more common than is generally realized. This condition should be considered in the evaluation of children with vomiting and abdominal pain, because it can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Clinical suspicion is ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0501/p2507.html

Anticipatory Guidance in Infant Oral Health: Rationale and Recommendations - American ...

Jan 1, 2000 - If appropriate measures are applied early enough, it may be possible to totally prevent oral disease. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that infants be scheduled for an initial oral evaluation within six months of the eruption of the first primary tooth but by no ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2000/0101/p115.html

Primary Nocturnal Enuresis: Current - American Family Physician

Mar 1, 1999 - Primary nocturnal enuresis sometimes presents significant psychosocial problems for children and their parents. Causative factors may include maturational delay, genetic influence, difficulties in waking and decreased nighttime secretion of antidiuretic hormone. Anatomic abnormalities ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0301/p1205.html

Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: Radiologic Decision-Making - American Family Physician

May 1, 2002 - Adolescent onset of severe idiopathic scoliosis has traditionally been evaluated using standing posteroanterior radiographs of the full spine to assess lateral curvature with the Cobb method. The most tilted vertebral bodies above and below the apex of the spinal curve are used to ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0501/p1817.html

Aseptic Meningitis in the Newborn and Young Infant - American Family Physician

May 15, 1999 - When a toxic newborn or young infant presents with fever and lethargy or irritability, it is important to consider the diagnosis of meningitis even if the classic localizing signs and symptoms are absent. Cerebrospinal fluid should be obtained (unless lumbar puncture is clinically ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0515/p2761.html

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