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Prevention of Iron Deficiency in Infants and Toddlers - American Family Physician

Oct 1, 2002 - The prevalence of nutritional iron deficiency anemia in infants and toddlers has declined dramatically since 1960. However, satisfaction with this achievement must be tempered because iron deficiency anemia in infants and toddlers is associated with long-lasting diminished mental, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/1001/p1217.html

Prevention of Unintentional Childhood Injuries - American Family Physician

Dec 1, 2006 - Injuries are the leading cause of death in children and teenagers in the United States. The leading causes of unintentional injury vary by age and include drowning, poisoning, suffocation, fires, burns, falls, and motor vehicle, bicycle, and pedestrian-related crashes. Most injuries are...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/1201/p1864.html

Prevention of Unintentional Childhood Injury - American Family Physician Restricted content. Login required.

Oct 1, 2020 - Unintentional injury accounts for one-third of deaths in children and adolescents each year, primarily from motor vehicle crashes. Children younger than 13 years should be restrained in the back seat, and infants and toddlers should remain rear-facing until at least two years of age. ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2020/1001/p411.html

Prevention of Unintentional Childhood Injury - American Family Physician

Apr 1, 2013 - Unintentional injury accounts for 40 percent of childhood deaths annually, most commonly from motor vehicle crashes. The proper use of child restraints is the most effective strategy to prevent injury or death. Motor vehicle restraint guidelines have recently been revised to an ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2013/0401/p502.html

Preventive Health Counseling for Adolescents - American Family Physician

Oct 1, 2006 - The leading causes of adolescent mortality are accidents (death from unintentional injury), homicide, and suicide. Additional morbidity is related to drug, tobacco, and alcohol use; risky sexual behaviors; poor nutrition; and inadequate physical activity. One third of adolescents engage...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/1001/p1151.html

Primary Care for Children with Autism - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2010 - The earliest sign of autism in children is the delayed attainment of social skill milestones, including joint attention, social orienting, and pretend play. Language impairment is a common, but less specific, sign of autism. Repetitive behaviors and restricted interests may not be noted...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/0215/p453.html

Primary Care of Infants and Young Children with Down Syndrome - American Family Physician

Jan 15, 1999 - Down syndrome is caused by triplicate material of chromosome 21. The syndrome has a variable physical expression, but congenital cardiac defects, transient myelodysplasia of the newborn and duodenal atresia are highly specific for this chromosomal disorder. Routine health maintenance is...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0115/p381.html

Primary Care of International Adoptees - American Family Physician

Dec 1, 1998 - International adoptees are presenting to family physicians with increasing frequency. U.S. citizens have adopted over 100,000 international children since 1979. Prospective parents may seek advice from their physician during the adoptive process. If available at all, medical information...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/1201/p2025.html

Primary Nocturnal Enuresis: Current - American Family Physician

Mar 1, 1999 - Primary nocturnal enuresis sometimes presents significant psychosocial problems for children and their parents. Causative factors may include maturational delay, genetic influence, difficulties in waking and decreased nighttime secretion of antidiuretic hormone. Anatomic abnormalities ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0301/p1205.html

Primary Prevention of Child Abuse - American Family Physician

Mar 15, 1999 - In 1993, the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect declared a child protection emergency. Between 1985 and 1993, there was a 50 percent increase in reported cases of child abuse. Three million cases of child abuse are reported in the United States each year. Treatment of the ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0315/p1577.html

Promoting Medication Adherence in Children - American Family Physician

Sep 1, 2006 - The problem of getting children to follow a treatment regimen is widespread and is frustrating for physicians. The extent to which any patient adheres to a medical regimen is an essential determinant of clinical success. Strategies to improve adherence in children include using ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0901/p793.html

Proper Use of Child Safety Seats - American Family Physician

May 15, 2002 - Motor vehicle crashes continue to be the leading cause of death in children one to 14 years of age. Used correctly, child safety seats significantly reduce child morbidity and mortality. Although many parents know child safety seats are important, more than 80 percent of seats are ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0515/p2085.html

Protecting the Health and Safety of Working Teenagers - American Family Physician

Aug 1, 1999 - More than one third of high school students work during the school year, and many more are employed during the summer months. Teenage workers face a variety of health and safety hazards. Occupational injury and illness are largely preventable, and family physicians can play a crucial ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0801/p575.html

Proteinuria in Children - American Family Physician

Sep 15, 2010 - Proteinuria is common in children and may represent a benign condition or a serious underlying renal disease or systemic disorder. Proteinuria may occur secondary to glomerular or tubular dysfunction. Although a 24-hour urine protein excretion test is usually recommended, it may be ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/0915/p645.html

Proteinuria in Children: Evaluation and Differential Diagnosis - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2017 - Although proteinuria is usually benign in the form of transient or orthostatic proteinuria, persistent proteinuria may be associated with more serious renal diseases. Proteinuria may be an independent risk factor for the progression of chronic kidney disease in children. Mechanisms of ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2017/0215/p248.html

Recognition and Management of Motor Delay and Muscle Weakness in Children - American ...

Jan 1, 2015 - Diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders in young children is often delayed for years after symptoms emerge, resulting in missed opportunities for therapy and genetic counseling. Identification of the weak child begins with careful attention to caregiver concerns and developmental ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/0101/p38.html

Recognition of Common Childhood Malignancies - American Family Physician

Apr 1, 2000 - Although cancer has an annual incidence of only about 150 new cases per 1 million U.S. children, it is the second leading cause of childhood deaths. Early detection and prompt therapy have the potential to reduce mortality. Leukemias, lymphomas and central nervous system tumors account ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2000/0401/p2144.html

Recurrent Abdominal Pain in Children - American Family Physician

Jun 15, 2018 - Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) in children is defined as at least three episodes of pain that occur over at least three months and affect the child’s ability to perform normal activities. RAP is most often considered functional (nonorganic) abdominal pain, but an organic cause is found ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2018/0615/p785.html

Reducing Tobacco Use in Adolescents - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2008 - After steadily decreasing since the late 1990s, adolescent smoking rates have stabilized at levels well above national goals. Experts recommend screening for tobacco use and exposure at every patient visit, although evidence of improved outcomes in adolescents is lacking. Counseling ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0215/p483.html

Respiratory Distress in the Newborn - American Family Physician

Oct 1, 2007 - The most common etiology of neonatal respiratory distress is transient tachypnea of the newborn; this is triggered by excessive lung fluid, and symptoms usually resolve spontaneously. Respiratory distress syndrome can occur in premature infants as a result of surfactant deficiency and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/1001/p987.html

Respiratory Syncytial Virus Bronchiolitis in Children - American Family Physician

Jan 15, 2017 - Bronchiolitis is a common lower respiratory tract infection in infants and young children, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of this infection. RSV is transmitted through contact with respiratory droplets either directly from an infected person or ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2017/0115/p94.html

Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Children - American Family Physician

Jan 15, 2011 - Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an RNA virus that causes respiratory tract infections in children. In the North- ern Hemisphere, the peak infection season is November through April. By two years of age, most children will have had an RSV infection. Bronchiolitis, a lower ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0115/p141.html

Retinoblastoma - American Family Physician

Mar 15, 2006 - Retinoblastoma, a neuroblastic tumor, is the most common primary intraocular malignancy of childhood. Patients usually present with leukokoria (white reflex or white pupil), detected in primary care. The mean age at diagnosis is 12 months for bilateral tumors and 24 months for ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0315/p1039.html

Revised AAP Guideline on UTI in Febrile Infants and Young Children - American Family ...

Nov 15, 2012 - In 2011, the American Academy of Pediatrics released a revision of its 1999 clinical practice guideline on urinary tract infections in febrile infants and young children two to 24 months of age. The new clinical practice guideline has several important updates based on evidence ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2012/1115/p940.html

Rickets: Not a Disease of the Past - American Family Physician

Aug 15, 2006 - Rickets develops when growing bones fail to mineralize. In most cases, the diagnosis is established with a thorough history and physical examination and confirmed by laboratory evaluation. Nutritional rickets can be caused by inadequate intake of nutrients (vitamin D in particular); ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0815/p619.html

Right Care for Children: Top Five Do's and Don'ts - American Family Physician

Mar 15, 2019 - Underuse and overuse of medical interventions, failure to use interventions known to be effective, and provision of tests or interventions in which benefits do not exceed harms are types of low-value care. The Lown Institute’s Right Care Alliance Children’s Health Council identified ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2019/0315/p376.html

Risks and Benefits of Pacifiers - American Family Physician

Apr 15, 2009 - Physicians are often asked for guidance about pacifier use in children, especially regarding the benefits and risks, and when to appropriately wean a child. The benefits of pacifier use include analgesic effects, shorter hospital stays for preterm infants, and a reduction in the risk of...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/0415/p681.html

Role of the Family Physician in the Care of Children with Down Syndrome - American ...

Dec 15, 2014 - Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality, occurring in one in 691 live births in the United States each year. Prenatally, the sequential contingent test for aneuploidy screening is highly sensitive for Down syndrome and has a low false-positive rate. The diagnosis should...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/1215/p851.html

School Absenteeism in Children and Adolescents - American Family Physician

Dec 15, 2018 - Frequent school absenteeism has immediate and long-term negative effects on academic performance, social functioning, high school and college graduation rates, adult income, health, and life expectancy. Previous research focused on distinguishing between truancy and anxiety-driven ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2018/1215/p738.html

School Problems and the Family Physician - American Family Physician

May 15, 1999 - Children with school problems pose a challenge for the family physician. A multidisciplinary team of professionals can most appropriately assess and manage complex learning problems, which are often the cause of poor school performance. The family physician's primary role in this ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0515/p2816.html

School Refusal in Children and Adolescents - American Family Physician

Oct 15, 2003 - School refusal is a problem that is stressful for children, families, and school personnel. Failing to attend school has significant short- and long-term effects on children's social, emotional, and educational development. School refusal often is associated with comorbid psychiatric ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/1015/p1555.html

Screening and Counseling Adolescents and Young Adults: A Framework for Comprehensive ... Restricted content. Login required.

Feb 1, 2020 - Healthy development is likely to occur when an adolescent’s risk factors are limited and when protective factors are fostered. Healthy development is further encouraged when youth feel valued, empowered, and form healthy social connections. Threats to the well-being of adolescents ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2020/0201/p147.html

Screening for Developmental Delay - American Family Physician

Sep 1, 2011 - According to the literature, 12 to 16 percent of children in the United States have at least one developmental delay, yet as many as one-half of affected children will not be identified by the time they enter kindergarten. If developmental delays are detected too late, opportunities for...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0901/p544.html

Screening for Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip - American Family Physician

Jul 1, 1999 - Screening programs relying primarily on physical examination techniques for the early detection and treatment of congenital hip abnormalities have not been as consistently successful as expected. Since the 1980s, increased attention has been given to ultrasound imaging of the hip in ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0701/p177.html

Sexual Behaviors in Children: Evaluation and Management - American Family Physician

Nov 15, 2010 - Sexual behaviors in children are common, occurring in 42 to 73 percent of children by the time they reach 13 years of age. Developmentally appropriate behavior that is common and frequently observed in children includes trying to view another person’s genitals or breasts, standing too ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/1115/p1233.html

Shoulder Instability in Young Athletes - American Family Physician

May 15, 1999 - Advertisement << Previous article Next article >> May 15, 1999 Issue Shoulder Instability in Young Athletes BRIAN L. MAHAFFEY, M.D., University of Missouri–Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, Missouri PATRICK A. SMITH, M.D., Columbia, Missouri Am Fam Physician. 1999 May...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0515/p2773.html

Sickle Cell Disease in Childhood: Part I. Laboratory Diagnosis, Pathophysiology and ...

Sep 1, 2000 - Over the past 25 years, morbidity and mortality have decreased significantly in children with sickle cell disease, and screening tests are now available to diagnose the disease in newborns. The incidence of sepsis caused by pneumococcal and Haemophilus influenzae infections has declined...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2000/0901/p1013.html

Sickle Cell Disease in Childhood: Part II. Diagnosis and Treatment of Major ...

Sep 15, 2000 - Treatment advances over the past 25 years have significantly decreased morbidity and mortality in children with sickle cell disease. Aggressive management of fever, early diagnosis of acute chest syndrome, judicious use of transfusions and proper treatment of pain can improve quality of...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2000/0915/p1309.html

SIDS: Counseling Parents to Reduce the Risk - American Family Physician

Apr 1, 1998 - Although the cause or causes of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) remain unknown, the incidence of SIDS is on the decline in the United States and other countries. This decline has been accomplished largely through public education campaigns informing parents about several important ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0401/p1566.html

Signs and Symptoms of Childhood Cancer: A Guide for Early Recognition - American Family...

Aug 1, 2013 - Although cancer in children is rare, it is the second most common cause of childhood mortality in developed countries. It often presents with nonspecific symptoms similar to those of benign conditions, leading to delays in the diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment. Primary ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2013/0801/p185.html

Sleep Disorders and Sleep Problems in Childhood - American Family Physician

Jan 15, 2001 - Sleep problems are common in childhood. A distinction is made between problems in which polysomnography is abnormal (i.e., the parasomnias, sleep apnea and narcolepsy) and problems that are behavioral in origin and have normal polysomnography. The parasomnias--sleep terrors, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0115/p277.html

Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis - American Family Physician

May 1, 1998 - Slipped capital femoral epiphysis occurs during the adolescent growth spurt and is most frequent in obese children. Up to 40 percent of cases are bilateral. Recent classification methods emphasize epiphyseal stability rather than symptom duration. Most cases of slipped capital femoral ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0501/p2135.html

Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis: Diagnosis and Management - American Family Physician

Jun 15, 2017 - Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is the most common hip disorder in adolescents, occurring in 10.8 per 100,000 children. SCFE usually occurs in those eight to 15 years of age and is one of the most commonly missed diagnoses in children. SCFE is classified as stable or unstable ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2017/0615/p779.html

Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis: Diagnosis and Management - American Family Physician

Aug 1, 2010 - Slipped capital femoral epiphysis is the most common hip disorder in adolescents, and it has a prevalence of 10.8 cases per 100,000 children. It usually occurs in children eight to 15 years of age, and it is one of the most commonly missed diagnoses in children. Slipped capital femoral ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/0801/p258.html

Specific Learning Disabilities: The Family Physician's Role - American Family Physician Restricted content. Login required.

Nov 15, 2019 - Academic underachievement, such as failing a class and the threat of being held back because of academic issues, is common. Family physicians can provide support and guidance for families as they approach their child’s unique academic challenges. Specific learning disabilities are a ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2019/1115/p628.html

Speech and Language Delay in Children - American Family Physician

May 15, 2011 - Speech and language delay in children is associated with increased difficulty with reading, writing, attention, and socialization. Although physicians should be alert to parental concerns and to whether children are meeting expected developmental milestones, there currently is ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0515/p1183.html

Strategies for Breastfeeding Success - American Family Physician

Jul 15, 2008 - Breastfeeding provides significant health benefits for infants and mothers. However, the United States continues to fall short of the breastfeeding goals set by the Healthy People 2010 initiative. The American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0715/p225.html

Stuttering: An Overview - American Family Physician

May 1, 2008 - Speech dysfluency (stuttering) is common in children. Although stuttering often resolves before adulthood, it can cause significant anxiety for children and their families. Stuttering speech patterns are often easily identifiable; when a child is learning to talk, repetition of sounds ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0501/p1271.html

Sudden Death in Young Athletes: Screening for the Needle in a Haystack - American ...

Jun 1, 1998 - Nontraumatic sudden death in young athletes is always disturbing, as apparently invincible athletes, become, without warning, victims of silent heart disease. Despite public perception to the contrary, sudden death in young athletes is exceedingly rare. It most commonly occurs in male ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0601/p2763.html

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome - American Family Physician

Jun 1, 2015 - Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the sudden unexpected death of a child younger than one year during sleep that cannot be explained after a postmortem evaluation including autopsy, a thorough history, and scene evaluation. The incidence of SIDS has decreased more than 50% in the ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/0601/p778.html

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