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Chronic Daily Headache: Diagnosis and Management - American Family Physician

Apr 15, 2014 - Chronic daily headache is defined as the presence of a headache on 15 days or more per month for at least three months. The most common types of chronic daily headache are chronic migraines and chronic tension-type headaches. If a red flag for a secondary cause of headache is present, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0415/p642.html

Multiple Sclerosis: A Primary Care Perspective - American Family Physician

Nov 1, 2014 - Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common permanently disabling disorder of the central nervous system in young adults. Relapsing remitting MS is the most common type, and typical symptoms include sensory disturbances, Lhermitte sign, motor weakness, optic neuritis, impaired ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/1101/p644.html

Subacute Management of Ischemic Stroke - American Family Physician

Dec 15, 2011 - Ischemic stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States and a common reason for hospitalization. The subacute period after a stroke refers to the time when the decision to not employ thrombolytics is made up until two weeks after the stroke occurred. Family physicians ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/1215/p1383.html

Update on Vitamin B12 Deficiency - American Family Physician

Jun 15, 2011 - Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency is a common cause of megaloblastic anemia, a variety of neuropsychiatric symp- toms, and elevated serum homocysteine levels, especially in older persons. There are a number of risk factors for vitamin B12 deficiency, including prolonged use of ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0615/p1425.html

Recognition and Evaluation of Nontraumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Ruptured ...

Oct 1, 2013 - Swift diagnosis and treatment are critical for good outcomes in patients with nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage, which is usually caused by a ruptured aneurysm. This type of stroke often results in death or disability. Rates of misdiagnosis and treatment delays for subarachnoid ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2013/1001/p451.html

Common Questions About Bell Palsy - American Family Physician

Feb 1, 2014 - Bell palsy is an acute affliction of the facial nerve, resulting in sudden paralysis or weakness of the muscles on one side of the face. Testing patients with unilateral facial paralysis for diabetes mellitus or Lyme disease is not routinely recommended. Patients with Lyme disease ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0201/p209.html

Parkinson Disease: An Update - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2013 - Parkinson disease is a progressive neurologic disorder afflicting approximately 1 percent of Americans older than 60 years. The cardinal features of Parkinson disease are bradykinesia, rigidity, tremor, and postural instability. There are a number of neurologic conditions that mimic the...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2013/0215/p267.html

Evaluation of Suspected Dementia - American Family Physician

Oct 15, 2011 - As the proportion of persons in the United States older than 65 years increases, the prevalence of dementia will increase as well. Risk factors for dementia include age, family history of dementia, apolipoprotein E4 genotype, cardiovascular comorbidities, chronic anticholinergic use, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/1015/p895.html

Evaluation of First Nonfebrile Seizures - American Family Physician

Aug 15, 2012 - Nonfebrile seizures may indicate underlying disease or epilepsy. The patient history can often distinguish epileptic seizures from nonepileptic disorders by identifying the events directly preceding the convulsion, associated conditions, and details of the seizure, including triggers, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2012/0815/p334.html

Febrile Seizures: Risks, Evaluation, and Prognosis - American Family Physician

Jan 15, 2012 - Febrile seizures are common in the first five years of life, and many factors that increase seizure risk have been identified. Initial evaluation should determine whether features of a complex seizure are present and identify the source of fever. Routine blood tests, neuroimaging, and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2012/0115/p149.html

Herpes Zoster and Postherpetic Neuralgia: Prevention and Management - American Family ...

Jun 15, 2011 - Herpes zoster (shingles) is diagnosed clinically by recognition of the distinctive, painful vesicular rash appearing in a unilateral, dermatomal distribution. An estimated 1 million cases occur in the United States each year, and increasing age is the primary risk factor. Laboratory ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0615/p1432.html

Transient Ischemic Attack: Part II. Risk Factor Modification and Treatment - American ...

Sep 15, 2012 - Interventions following a transient ischemic attack are aimed at preventing a future episode or stroke. Hypertension, current smoking, obesity, physical inactivity, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia are all well-known risk factors, and controlling these factors can have dramatic ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2012/0915/p527.html

Subacute to Chronic Mild Traumatic Brain Injury - American Family Physician

Dec 1, 2012 - Although a universally accepted definition is lacking, mild traumatic brain injury and concussion are classified by transient loss of consciousness, amnesia, altered mental status, a Glasgow Coma Score of 13 to 15, and focal neurologic deficits following an acute closed head injury. ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2012/1201/p1045.html

Treatment of Alzheimer Disease - American Family Physician

Jun 15, 2011 - Alzheimer disease is the most common form of dementia, affecting more than one-third of Americans older than 85 years. It is characterized by progressive memory loss and cognitive decline. Amyloid plaque accumulation, neurofibrillary tau tangles, and depletion of acetylcholine are among...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0615/p1403.html

Rational Use of Opioids for Management of Chronic Nonterminal Pain - American Family ...

Aug 1, 2012 - Opioid prescribing for chronic nonterminal pain has increased in recent years, although evidence for its long-term effectiveness is weak and its potential for harm is significant. Nonmedical use of prescription opioids, diversion, and overdose deaths have also increased sharply, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2012/0801/p252.html

Current Concepts in Concussion: Evaluation and Management - American Family Physician

Jan 15, 2012 - Concussion is a disturbance in brain function caused by direct or indirect force to the head. It is a functional rather than structural injury that results from shear stress to brain tissue caused by rotational or angular forces—direct impact to the head is not required. Initial ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2012/0115/p123.html

Cerebrospinal Fluid Analysis - American Family Physician

Sep 15, 2003 - Lumbar puncture is frequently performed in primary care. Properly interpreted tests can make cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) a key tool in the diagnosis of a variety of diseases. Proper evaluation of CSF depends on knowing which tests to order, normal ranges for the patient's age, and the ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2003/0915/p1103.html

Evaluation of the Patient with Muscle Weakness - American Family Physician

Apr 1, 2005 - Muscle weakness is a common complaint among patients presenting to family physicians. Diagnosis begins with a patient history distinguishing weakness from fatigue or asthenia, separate conditions with different etiologies that can coexist with, or be confused for, weakness. The pattern ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0401/p1327.html

Chronic Low Back Pain: Evaluation and Management - American Family Physician

Jun 15, 2009 - Chronic low back pain is a common problem in primary care. A history and physical examination should place patients into one of several categories: (1) nonspecific low back pain; (2) back pain associated with radiculopathy or spinal stenosis; (3) back pain referred from a nonspinal ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/0615/p1067.html

Medications for Migraine Prophylaxis - American Family Physician

Jan 1, 2006 - Sufficient evidence and consensus exist to recommend propranolol, timolol, amitriptyline, divalproex, sodium valproate, and topiramate as first-line agents for migraine prevention. There is fair evidence of effectiveness with gabapentin and naproxen sodium. Botulinum toxin also has ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2006/0101/p72.html

Treatment of Vertigo - American Family Physician

Mar 15, 2005 - Vertigo is the illusion of motion, usually rotational motion. As patients age, vertigo becomes an increasingly common presenting complaint. The most common causes of this condition are benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, acute vestibular neuronitis or labyrinthitis, Ménière's ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0315/p1115.html

Trigeminal Neuralgia - American Family Physician

May 1, 2008 - Trigeminal neuralgia is an uncommon disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of lancinating pain in the trigeminal nerve distribution. Typically, brief attacks are triggered by talking, chewing, teeth brushing, shaving, a light touch, or even a cool breeze. The pain is nearly always ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2008/0501/p1291.html

Acute Stroke Diagnosis - American Family Physician

Jul 1, 2009 - Stroke can be categorized as ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Awakening with or experiencing the abrupt onset of focal neurologic deficits is the hallmark of ischemic stroke diagnosis. The most common presenting symptoms for ischemic stroke are ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/0701/p33.html

Treating Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathic Pain - American Family Physician

Jul 15, 2010 - Diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain affects the functionality, mood, and sleep patterns of approximately 10 to 20 percent of patients with diabetes mellitus. Treatment goals include restoring function and improving pain control. Patients can realistically expect a 30 to 50 percent ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/0715/p151.html

Frontotemporal Dementia: A Review for Primary Care Physicians - American Family Physician

Dec 1, 2010 - Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is one of the most common forms of dementia in persons younger than 65 years. Variants include behavioral variant FTD, semantic dementia, and progressive nonfluent aphasia. Behavioral and language manifestations are core features of FTD, and patients have ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/1201/p1372.html

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