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Acute Bacterial Prostatitis: Diagnosis and Management - American Family Physician

Jan 15, 2016 - Acute bacterial prostatitis is an acute infection of the prostate gland that causes pelvic pain and urinary tract symptoms, such as dysuria, urinary frequency, and urinary retention, and may lead to systemic symptoms, such as fevers, chills, nausea, emesis, and malaise. Although the ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2016/0115/p114.html

A Systematic Approach to the Evaluation of a Limping Child - American Family Physician

Nov 15, 2015 - A limp is defined as a deviation from a normal age-appropriate gait pattern resulting in an uneven, jerky, or laborious gait. It can be caused by pain, weakness, or deformity as a result of a variety of conditions. Transient synovitis is the most common diagnosis. Other causes of acute ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/1115/p908.html

Dysuria: Evaluation and Differential Diagnosis in Adults - American Family Physician

Nov 1, 2015 - The most common cause of acute dysuria is infection, especially cystitis. Other infectious causes include urethritis, sexually transmitted infections, and vaginitis. Noninfectious inflammatory causes include a foreign body in the urinary tract and dermatologic conditions. ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/1101/p778.html

Diagnosis and Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Infants and Children - American ...

Oct 15, 2015 - Gastroesophageal reflux is defined as the passage of stomach contents into the esophagus with or without accompanied regurgitation (spitting up) and vomiting. It is a normal physiologic process that occurs throughout the day in infants and less often in children and adolescents. ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/1015/p705.html

Diagnosis and Management of Foodborne Illness - American Family Physician

Sep 1, 2015 - The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that each year, one in six Americans will experience a foodborne illness. The most common causes in the United States are viruses, such as norovirus; bacteria, such as Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Campylobacter, and Listeria; and...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/0901/p358.html

Evaluation of Short and Tall Stature in Children - American Family Physician

Jul 1, 2015 - Short stature is defined as a height more than two standard deviations below the mean for age (less than the 3rd percentile). Tall stature is defined as a height more than two standard deviations above the mean for age (greater than the 97th percentile). The initial evaluation of short ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/0701/p43.html

Recognition and Differential Diagnosis of Psychosis in Primary Care - American Family ...

Jun 15, 2015 - Psychosis is a symptom complex that may include hallucinations, delusions, disorders of thought, and disorganized speech or behavior. Acute psychosis is primary if it is symptomatic of a psychiatric disorder, or secondary if caused by a specific medical condition. Patients with primary ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/0615/p856.html

Evaluation of Neck Masses in Adults - American Family Physician

May 15, 2015 - Neck masses are often seen in clinical practice, and the family physician should be able to determine the etiology of a mass using organized, efficient diagnostic methods. The first goal is to determine if the mass is malignant or benign; malignancies are more common in adult smokers ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/0515/p698.html

Diagnosis and Management of Kawasaki Disease - American Family Physician

Mar 15, 2015 - Kawasaki disease is an acute, systemic vasculitis that predominantly affects patients younger than five years. It represents the most prominent cause of acquired coronary artery disease in childhood. In the United States, 19 per 100,000 children younger than five years are hospitalized ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/0315/p365.html

Common Questions About Infectious Mononucleosis - American Family Physician

Mar 15, 2015 - Epstein-Barr is a ubiquitous virus that infects 95% of the world population at some point in life. Although Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infections are often asymptomatic, some patients present with the clinical syndrome of infectious mononucleosis (IM). The syndrome most commonly occurs ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/0315/p372.html

Diagnosis and Management of Sodium Disorders: Hyponatremia and Hypernatremia - American...

Mar 1, 2015 - Hyponatremia and hypernatremia are common findings in the inpatient and outpatient settings. Sodium disorders are associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Plasma osmolality plays a critical role in the pathophysiology and treatment of sodium disorders. Hyponatremia ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/0301/p299.html

Diagnosis and Treatment of Peptic Ulcer Disease and H. pylori Infection - American ...

Feb 15, 2015 - The most common causes of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) are Helicobacter pylori infection and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The test-and-treat strategy for detecting H. pylori is appropriate in situations where the risk of gastric cancer is low based on age younger ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/0215/p236.html

Hemoptysis: Evaluation and Management - American Family Physician

Feb 15, 2015 - Hemoptysis is the expectoration of blood from the lung parenchyma or airways. The initial step in the evaluation is determining the origin of bleeding. Pseudohemoptysis is identified through the history and physical examination. In adults, acute respiratory tract infections (e.g., ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/0215/p243.html

Diagnosis and Treatment of Seborrheic Dermatitis - American Family Physician

Feb 1, 2015 - Seborrheic dermatitis is a common skin condition in infants, adolescents, and adults. The characteristic symptoms—scaling, erythema, and itching—occur most often on the scalp, face, chest, back, axilla, and groin. Seborrheic dermatitis is a clinical diagnosis based on the location and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/0201/p185.html

Abnormal Electrocardiogram Findings During an Occupational Physical Examination - Photo...

Dec 15, 2014 - A 27-year-old man with normal personal and family histories presented for an occupational physical examination. On cardiac examination, he had a grade II/VI systolic ejection murmur that was softer during inspiration. An electrocardiogram was obtained.

American Family Physician : Photo Quiz

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/1215/p861.html

Schizophrenia - American Family Physician

Dec 1, 2014 - Schizophrenia is the most common psychotic disease, with a global prevalence of less than 1%. It affects all ethnicities and is slightly more common in men. Patients with schizophrenia commonly experience debilitating social and occupational impairments, but some are able to function ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/1201/p775.html

Common Questions About the Diagnosis and Management of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia - ...

Dec 1, 2014 - Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common condition that increases in prevalence with age. A history should include onset, duration, and severity of lower urinary tract symptoms and medication use to rule out other causes of symptoms. Physical examination includes a digital rectal ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/1201/p769.html

Diagnosis and Management of Tinea Infections - American Family Physician

Nov 15, 2014 - Tinea infections are caused by dermatophytes and are classified by the involved site. The most common infections in prepubertal children are tinea corporis and tinea capitis, whereas adolescents and adults are more likely to develop tinea cruris, tinea pedis, and tinea unguium ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/1115/p702.html

Acute Pancreatitis - American Family Physician

Nov 1, 2014 - Acute pancreatitis is most commonly caused by gallstones or chronic alcohol use, and accounts for more than 200,000 hospital admissions annually. Using the Atlanta criteria, acute pancreatitis is diagnosed when a patient presents with two of three findings, including abdominal pain ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/1101/p632.html

Enuresis in Children: A Case Based Approach - American Family Physician

Oct 15, 2014 - Enuresis is defined as intermittent urinary incontinence during sleep in a child at least five years of age. Approximately 5% to 10% of all seven-year-olds have enuresis, and an estimated 5 to 7 million children in the United States have enuresis. The pathophysiology of primary ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/1015/p560.html

Urinalysis: Case Presentations for the Primary Care Physician - American Family Physician

Oct 15, 2014 - Urinalysis is useful in diagnosing systemic and genitourinary conditions. In patients with suspected microscopic hematuria, urine dipstick testing may suggest the presence of blood, but results should be confirmed with a microscopic examination. In the absence of obvious causes, the ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/1015/p542.html

Management of External Genital Warts - American Family Physician

Sep 1, 2014 - Genital warts affect 1% of the sexually active U.S. population and are commonly seen in primary care. Human papillomavirus types 6 and 11 are responsible for most genital warts. Warts vary from small, flat-topped papules to large, cauliflower-like lesions on the anogenital mucosa and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0901/p312.html

Impetigo: Diagnosis and Treatment - American Family Physician

Aug 15, 2014 - Impetigo is the most common bacterial skin infection in children two to five years of age. There are two principal types: nonbullous (70% of cases) and bullous (30% of cases). Nonbullous impetigo, or impetigo contagiosa, is caused by Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes, and ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0815/p229.html

Evaluation and Treatment of Constipation in Children and Adolescents - American Family ...

Jul 15, 2014 - Childhood constipation is common and almost always functional without an organic etiology. Stool retention can lead to fecal incontinence in some patients. Often, a medical history and physical examination are sufficient to diagnose functional constipation. Further evaluation for ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0715/p82.html

Nausea and Vomiting of Pregnancy - American Family Physician

Jun 15, 2014 - Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy affects nearly 75% of pregnant women. The exact cause is unknown. In most cases, it is a mild, self-limited condition that can be controlled with conservative measures and has no adverse fetal sequelae. About 1% of women develop hyperemesis gravidarum, ...

American Family Physician : Article

https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0615/p965.html

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