Lown Right Care

Reducing Overuse and Underuse

Fracture Prevention in Older Adults

 

Am Fam Physician. 2020 Mar 15;101(6):370-372.

Author disclosure: No relevant financial affiliations.

Case Scenario

Ms. M is an 82-year-old white woman who lives alone at home. She has a body mass index of 20 kg per m2 and describes her health as good. However, she takes medications for hypertension and has mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease attributed to a long-term half-a-pack-per-day smoking habit. She has received several short courses of corticosteroids for acute chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations during the past five years. She does not drink alcohol and has not had any fractures. She is relatively sedentary and uses a walker outside her home. Using the combined Lee Schonberg Index (https://eprognosis.ucsf.edu/leeschonberg.php), her estimated life expectancy is five to seven years.1 Her Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/FRAX/) score, calculated without a dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) measurement, indicates that she has a 26% chance of a hip fracture during the next 10 years.2 Should Ms. M be prescribed medication to prevent osteoporotic fractures?

Clinical Commentary

Vertebral fractures can be painful; however, most are asymptomatic and discovered incidentally in 20% of women 80 to 89 years of age.3 Older adults with hip fractures, however, often require skilled nursing care and are unable to return home. In a survey of older women, 80% reported preferring death over a hip fracture leading to hospitalization.4 Falls cause more than 95% of hip fractures, and measures to reduce the risk of falls should be encouraged even if medication is prescribed.5

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TAKE-HOME MESSAGES FOR RIGHT CARE

Fall prevention and lifestyle modifications are important in preventing osteoporotic fractures.

If possible, eliminate medications with adverse effects that can increase fall risk.

Estimated life expectancy and not chronologic age should be considered when assessing the need for osteoporosis therapy.

Document the start of treatment in the patient's problem list, and advise the patient that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends stopping pharmacologic treatment after five years.

TAKE-HOME MESSAGES FOR RIGHT CARE

Fall prevention and lifestyle modifications are important in preventing osteoporotic fractures.

If possible, eliminate medications with adverse effects that can increase fall risk.

Estimated life expectancy and not chronologic age should be considered when assessing the need for osteoporosis therapy.

Document the start of treatment in the patient's problem list, and advise the patient that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends stopping pharmacologic treatment after five years.

The American College of Physicians published an evidence-based guideline for the treatment of osteoporosis that has been endorsed by the American Academy of Family Physicians.6,7 The American College of Physicians recommends that clinicians offer pharmacologic therapy for five years without repeat bone density monitoring to reduce the risk of hip and vertebral fractures in women with osteoporosis.

The question of whether to prescribe medication to Ms. M does not have a straightforward answer. Guidelines for screening and treating adults for osteoporosis have not considered age, comorbidities, or frailty.8 The mean age of participants in randomized controlled trials of osteoporosis drugs is 64 years; however, the mean age of those presenting with a hip fracture is 85 years.9 Older adults and their clinicians should consider nonpharmacologic alternatives, taking into consideration the patient's estimated life expectancy rather than chronologic age.

Clinicians should routinely assess the patient's balance, gait, vision, postural blood pressure, medications, environment, cognition, and psychological health. Making the patient's home “fracture proof” is a great place to start, and occupational therapists from home health agencies can help with this. Fracture proofing a home can include installing textured pads in showers and on slippery floors; taping down edges of rugs and mats; and making sure the lighting in the home is adequate, specifically in stairways and between the bed and bathroom.10

In addition to environmental modifications, a variety of lifestyle modifications can also prevent fractures. These

Address correspondence to Ann Lindsay, MD, at adlindsa@stanford.edu. Reprints are not available from the author.

Author disclosure: No relevant financial affiliations.

References

show all references

1. ePrognosis. Combined Lee Schonberg Index. Accessed October 4, 2019. https://eprognosis.ucsf.edu/leeschonberg-result.php...

2. Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield, UK. Fracture Risk Assessment Tool. Accessed October 2019. https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/FRAX/tool.aspx?country=9

3. Cosman F. The evolving role of anabolic therapy in the treatment of osteoporosis. Curr Opin Rheumatol. 2019;31(4):376–380.

4. Salkeld G, Cameron ID, Cumming RG, et al. Quality of life related to fear of falling and hip fracture in older women: a time trade off study. BMJ. 2000;320(7231):341–346.

5. Parkkari J, Kannus P, Palvanen M, et al. Majority of hip fractures occur as a result of a fall and impact on the greater trochanter of the femur: a prospective controlled hip fracture study with 206 consecutive patients. Calcif Tissue Int. 1999;65(3):183–187.

6. Qaseem A, Forciea MA, McLean RM, et al.; Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians. Treatment of low bone density or osteoporosis to prevent fractures in men and women: a clinical practice guideline update from the American College of Physicians [published correction appears in Ann Intern Med. 2017;167(6):448]. Ann Intern Med. 2017;166(11):818–839.

7. American Academy of Family Physicians. Clinical practice guideline. Treatment of low bone density or osteoporosis. April 2017. Accessed January 21, 2020. https://www.aafp.org/patient-care/clinical-recommendations/all/osteoporosis-cpg.html

8. Berry SD, Shi S, Kiel DP. Considering the risks and benefits of osteoporosis treatment in older adults. JAMA Intern Med. 2019;179(8):1103–1104.

9. McGarvey C, Coughlan T, O'Neill D. Ageism in studies on the management of osteoporosis. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2017;65(7):1566–1568.

10. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Pocket guide: preventing falls in older patients. Accessed October 2019. https://www.cdc.gov/steadi/pdf/STEADI-PocketGuide-508.pdf

11. Brander C. Osteoporosis: making sense of a diagnosis and tough decisions about treatment. National Women's Health Network. January 30, 2018. Accessed October 2019. https://nwhn.org/osteoporosis-making-sense-diagnosis-tough-decisions-treatment/

12. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Osteoporosis prevention, diagnosis, and therapy. National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference statement, March 27 to 29, 2000. Accessed January 24, 2020. https://consensus.nih.gov/2000/2000osteoporosis111html.htm

13. Burt LA, Billington EO, Rose MS, et al. Effect of high-dose vitamin D supplementation on volumetric bone density and bone strength: a randomized clinical trial [published correction appears in JAMA. 2019;322(19):1925]. JAMA. 2019;322(8):736–745.

14. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. How long should you take certain osteoporosis drugs? Accessed January 21, 2020. https://www.fda.gov/consumers/consumer-updates/how-long-should-you-take-certain-osteoporosis-drugs

Lown Institute Right Care Alliance is a grassroots coalition of clinicians, patients, and community members organizing to make health care institutions accountable to communities and to put patients, not profits, at the heart of health care.

This series is coordinated by Kenny Lin, MD, MPH, deputy editor.

 

 

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