Putting Prevention into Practice

An Evidence-Based Approach

Primary Care Interventions for Prevention and Cessation of Tobacco Use in Children and Adolescents

 

Am Fam Physician. 2020 Aug 15;102(4):241-242.

Related U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement: Primary Care Interventions for Prevention and Cessation of Tobacco Use in Children and Adolescents: Recommendation Statement

Author disclosure: No relevant financial affiliations.

Case Study

J.P., a 13-year-old girl, presents to your clinic for a routine well-child visit. She has no acute concerns, is doing well in school, plays sports, and is generally healthy. J.P. reports that she has never used tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) or vaping.

Case Study Questions

1. Based on U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations, which tobacco prevention interventions should you provide to J.P.?

  • A. No interventions are indicated at this time because J.P. does not smoke.

  • B. You should provide education or brief counseling interventions to prevent J.P. from starting to vape.

  • C. You should provide print materials, face-to-face counseling, computer-based interventions, or telephone counseling to prevent J.P. from starting to smoke.

  • D. You should offer pharmacotherapy interventions to prevent J.P. from starting to use tobacco products.

2. According to the USPSTF recommendations, interventions to prevent tobacco use should be provided to which one of the following populations?

  • A. Children and adolescents at increased risk of tobacco use because they live in a rural area.

  • B. Adolescent White males because they have the highest smoking rates.

  • C. School-aged children at increased risk of tobacco use because they have parents who smoke.

  • D. Adolescents at increased risk because they have friends who vape.

  • E. All youth, whether they have risk factors for tobacco use or not.

3. Which one of the following cessation interventions does the USPSTF recommend for children and adolescents who use tobacco?

  • A. The USPSTF recommends providing behavioral counseling interventions because there is convincing evidence that they are effective in helping school-aged children and adolescents quit tobacco use.

  • B. The USPSTF recommends offering tobacco cessation medications because there is adequate evidence that they are effective in helping school-aged children and adolescents quit tobacco use.

  • C. The USPSTF recommends referring patients to self-guided

Author disclosure: No relevant financial affiliations.

References

1. US Preventive Services Task Force. Primary care interventions for prevention and cessation of tobacco use in children and adolescents: US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. JAMA. 2020;323(16):1590–1598.

2. Selph S, Patnode C, Bailey SR, et al. Primary care–relevant interventions for tobacco and nicotine use prevention and cessation in children and adolescents: updated evidence report and systematic review for the US Preventive Services Task Force. JAMA. 2020;323(16):1599–1608.

This PPIP quiz is based on the recommendations of the USPSTF. More information is available in the USPSTF Recommendation Statement and supporting documents on the USPSTF website (https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org). The practice recommendations in this activity are available at https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/recommendation/tobacco-and-nicotine-use-prevention-in-children-and-adolescents-primary-care-interventions.

This series is coordinated by Kenny Lin, MD, MPH, deputy editor.

A collection of Putting Prevention into Practice published in AFP is available at https://www.aafp.org/afp/ppip.

 

 

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