• Articles

    Jaundice in the Adult Patient

    SEAN P. ROCHE, REBECCA KOBOS

    Jaundice can be caused by benign or life-threatening disorders. To make the work-up more manageable, it may help to organize the differential diagnosis by prehepatic, intrahepatic, and posthepatic causes.

    Facilitating Treatment Adherence with Lifestyle Changes in Diabetes

    MARLON RUSSELL KOENIGSBERG, DONALD BARTLETT, J. STEVEN CRAMER

    Family physicians can help patients who are at risk for diabetes delay or prevent complications by teaching them how to modify their lifestyles. By individualizing goals to the patient's preferences and progress, physicians can facilitate long-term results.

    Treating Acute Bronchiolitis Associated with RSV

    ROBERT WILLIAM PRASAAD STEINER

    Bronchiolitis associated with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of hospitalization in infants younger than one year. Supportive care, attention to adequate hydration and, possibly, supplemental oxygen are the basis of therapy. Certain pharmacologic...

    Hyperparathyroidism

    EDNA D. TANIEGRA

    Primary hyperparathyroidism usually presents as an incidental finding of asymptomatic hypercalcemia on a chemistry panel. Parathyroidectomy is the definitive treatment for primary hyperparathyroidism.

    Pediculosis and Scabies

    DAVID C. FLINDERS, PETER DE SCHWEINITZ

    Pediculosis and scabies are caused by ectoparasites, and patients usually present with itching. Various treatments are available, but environmental measures are essential to prevent reinfestation.

    Inside AFP

    Tools to Help Your Patients Through the Cold and Flu Season

    Janis Wright

    This winter's assortment of viruses promises to fill the waiting rooms of family physicians with patients who have fevers, coughs, sore throats, runny noses, aches and pains, and other symptoms of colds or flu. This issue of AFP provides a collection of patient information...

    Newsletter

    Newsletter

    Matthew Neff

    HHS Announces Medicare Prescription Drug Discount Card Program | Future of Family Medicine Project Recommendations Available Online | International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases to Be Held | HHS Funds Disease Surveillance System Along U.S.-Mexico Border |...

    Quantum Sufficit

    Quantum Sufficit

    Sarah Evans, Heather McNeill

    Where there is depression, there also may be chronic pain. As published in Internal Medicine News, reports on the findings of a survey presented at the American Psychiatric Association's annual meeting indicate that two thirds of patients with major depression also have...

    Editorials

    Preventive Therapy for Diabetes: Lifestyle Changes and the Primary Care Physician

    MARTIN S. LIPSKY, LISA K. SHARP

    During the past decade, the United States has been part of the worldwide epidemic of obesity and diabetes. From 1990 to 2000, the percentage of U.S. adults with diabetes rose from 4.9 to 7.3 percent, an astounding increase of 49 percent.1 Now more than 17 million Americans...

    Diary from a Week in Practice

    Diary from a Week in Practice

    It's been said that we see the world not as it is but as we are. I think of that today as I pay a call on Muriel Hollander. “I'm great!” she tells me, gray and white hair cascading over a hospital pillow, blue eyes bright and eager. A 92-year-old widow, Mrs. Hollander lives...

    U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

    Behavioral Interventions to Promote Breastfeeding: Recommendations and Rationale

    This statement summarizes the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations on counseling to promote breastfeeding, a new topic for the USPSTF. Explanations of the ratings and of the strength of overall evidence are given in Tables 1 and 2, respectively. The...

    Clinical Inquiries

    Does a Low-Sodium Diet Reduce Blood Pressure?

    JOHN SMUCNY

    In patients with hypertension without comorbidity, does a low-sodium diet reduce blood pressure and decrease morbidity or mortality?

    STEPS

    Tegaserod (Zelnorm) for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    G. ROBERT DEYOUNG

    Synopsis: Tegaserod (Zelnorm) is the first treatment approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the short-term management of constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (c-IBS) in women. A partial agonist of serotonin subtype-4 (5-HT4) receptors,...

    Point-of-Care Guides

    Suspected Pulmonary Embolism: Part I. Evidence-Based Clinical Assessment

    MARK H. EBELL

    How can the history and physical examination help physicians diagnose pulmonary embolism?

    Photo Quiz

    Velvety Axillary Lesions

    ELIZABETH A. LEONARD, ANTHONY J. VIERA

    A 46-year-old woman presented for her annual well-woman examination and Papanicolaou smear. She had no complaints, except for occasional itchiness associated with skin lesions (see accompanying figure) that were symmetrically present in both axillae.

    POEMs

    Cholinesterase Inhibitors for Alzheimer's Disease

    MARK EBELL

    Early Mobilization Improves Pneumonia Outcomes

    MARK EBELL

    Single Daily Dose of Proton Pump Inhibitor Effective

    MARK EBELL

    Lipid Control Is Crucial in Patients with Diabetes

    ALLEN F. SHAUGHNESSY

    Tips from Other Journals

    Using Rectal Misoprostol in the Third Stage of Labor

    ANNE D. WALLING

    Effects of Physical Activity on Mortality in Older Women

    CAROLINE WELLBERY

    Four Patterns of Dying Require Different End-of-Life Care

    CAROLINE WELLBERY

    Staged Classification for Management of Heart Failure

    BILL ZEPF

    Increasing Adherence to Pap Screening Guidelines

    KARL E. MILLER

    Antibiotics for Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    KARL E. MILLER

    Which Patients Are Likely to Survive Ovarian Cancer?

    ANNE D. WALLING

    Evaluation and Management of Hirsutism in Women

    ANNE D. WALLING

    Clarithromycin vs. Azithromycin for Pneumonia

    BILL ZEPF

    Less Common Gene Variants and Infectious Disease

    RICHARD SADOVSKY

    Hormone Therapy and Health-Related Quality of Life

    BILL ZEPF

    Strength Training Eases Chronic Neck Pain in Women

    CAROLINE WELLBERY

    Diuretics Are Treatment of Choice for Hypertension

    CAROLINE WELLBERY

    New Options for Insulin Use in Patients with Diabetes

    CAROLINE WELLBERY

    POEMs and Tips

    Diuretics Are Treatment of Choice for Hypertension

    CAROLINE WELLBERY

    Practice Guidelines

    ACOG Releases Bulletin on Managing Cervical Insufficiency

    Genevieve W. Ressel

    The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recently published a clinical management guideline on cervical insufficiency. The complete guideline, ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 48, appeared in the November 2003 issue of Obstetrics and Gynecology. This report...

    Clinical Briefs

    Clinical Briefs

    Carrie Morantz, Brian Torrey

    ACOG Opinion Paper on Elective Surgery | CDC Report on Physical Activity Among Children | AHRQ Report on Spending for Prescribed Medicines

    Letters to the Editor

    Use of Metformin Is a Cause of Vitamin B12 Deficiency

    Information from Your Family Doctor

    Sticking to Lifestyle Changes: Increasing Physical Activity

    You don't always need high-intensity exercise to improve fitness and decrease health risks. Increasing the amount of moderate physical activity (like walking or gardening) has clear health benefits. Start with simple, everyday activities that are fun and easy for you to do....

    Sticking to Lifestyle Changes: Healthy Eating

    Start easy, with a food diary. Use a chart or a journal to write down everything you eat or drink every day. Write down the date, the time of day, and about how much of every food or beverage you ate and drank. Be complete and honest. Stick with the food diary. This is the...

    Hyperparathyroidism

    At the front of your neck, behind the thyroid gland, lie the four small parathyroid glands. (Say: pair-ah-thigh-royd) The hormone they make is called parathyroid hormone. This hormone keeps the right levels of calcium and phosphorus in your blood and bones. It also helps your...

    Head Lice

    Head lice are small, wingless insects (bugs) that can get on the hair and scalp of humans. Anyone can get head lice—usually from head-to-head contact, but perhaps also from sharing hats, combs, and brushes. Head lice do not jump or fly.

    Antibiotics: When They Can and Can't Help

    Antibiotics are strong medicines that can stop some infections and save lives. But antibiotics can cause more harm than good if they are not used the right way. You can protect yourself and your family by knowing when you should use antibiotics and when you shouldn't.

    Influenza Vaccine

    Influenza (also called the flu) is a viral infection in the nose, throat, and lungs. About 10 to 20 percent of Americans get the flu each year. Some people get very sick. Each year, about 130,000 people go to a hospital with the flu, and 20,000 people die because of the flu...

    Flu and Colds

    Colds and the flu (also called influenza) have many of the same symptoms. A cold is generally mild, while the flu tends to be more severe.

    Acute Bronchitis

    Acute bronchitis is an infection of the bronchial tree. The bronchial (say: “brawn-keeull”) tree is made up of the tubes that carry air into your lungs. When these tubes get infected, they swell up, and mucus (thick fluid) forms. This makes it hard for you to breathe. You...

    Sore Throat

    Pharyngitis (say: “fare-en-jy-tis”)—which is what your doctor calls a sore throat—can be caused by many things. Sometimes, when mucus from your sinuses drains into your throat, the drainage can make your throat feel sore. Viruses (such as those that cause the common cold) and...



    Disclosure

    All editors in a position to control content for this activity, AFP journal, are required to disclose any relevant financial relationships. View disclosures.


    Tag Legend

    Legend

    CME CME
    POC POC
    FREE Free
    Alg Alg
    DDx DDx
    PtEd PtEd